Archive held by RTE

Personalities/Groups                     Fitzmaurice, Gabriel (1952 -)

 

Description                         Poet, author and teacher Gabriel Fitzmaurice from Moyvane, County Kerry, during the recording of the sixth series of RTÉ Television's traditional Irish music series 'The Pure Drop' in January 1992.

 

 

 

This series of 'The Pure Drop' came from the Pearse Museum in St Enda's Park, Rathfarnham, County Dublin. Gabriel Fitzmaurice appeared on the first episode broadcast 2 March 1992. 

 

Collection                            RTÉ Stills Department 

 

Photographer                    Rowe, John  

 

https://stillslibrary.rte.ie/indexplus/result.html

 

Telling it as I see it

 

 

 

By  Domhnall de Barra

 

 

 

A couple of items in the news this week reminded me of the fact that we are a nation of begrudgers at heart. Every time somebody climbs the ladder of success there are those at the foot of that ladder trying to topple it. First we have the investigation into the spending at Áras an Úachtarán. Call me cynical but I see opportunist politics written all over this. Why is this happening now, during a presidential election when nobody asked a question over the past seven years?  It is a blatant attempt to cast a shadow over Michael D. Higgins and his attempt to get re-elected to a post he has filled admirably. That politicians can suddenly get worried about  sums that are insignificant in the grand scheme of things when there is so much waste going on in other departments is baffling. Then you have the commentators who question the amount of money spent on hotels for the President while he is abroad on official duties. Do they want to book him into air bnb’s ?  Should he queue up for a seat  on a Ryanair flight?  Let’s go the whole hog and have him use his travel pass at home and use  the bus and the Luas to get around. What nonsense.  Our President is our representative around the world, the holder of our highest office, and should be given  the  treatment that office deserves. Maybe we don’t need a president at all and people are entitled to that opinion but, while the office is in existence, let us treat it with respect and dignity. Look at the way the image of our country has been portrayed by Michael D., Mary McAleese and Mary Robinson.  They have been the face of all that is good about an Ireland that has finally thrown off the shackles of church and oppressor and cannot just stand shoulder to shoulder with other nations but, as has been proven by recent referendums, lead the way. Let us hope that Michael D. or whoever else is elected president, will not be curtailed by a lack of funds to continue the good work.

 

 

 

Secondly, the J.P. MacManus affair. J.P., a long time supporter of the G.A.A., gave a very generous grant of €3.2 million to the organisation around the country. One would think that we would all be delighted at this gesture and be grateful but, oh no, not all. I was flabbergasted listening to the Joe Duffy show the other day when the begrudgers again came out of the woodwork to throw cold water over the affair. They brought into question J.P.’s financial affairs and the fact that he does not pay income tax in this country.  The sentiment seemed to be; we all have to pay for our services so why shouldn’t he?  For a start let us look at the facts. J.P.’s business is worldwide and therefore his headquarters are not based in Ireland. There is nothing illegal about that but to say he does not contribute to the finances  of this country is wrong. He provides employment for hundreds of people around the country through his projects and his racehorses. If he decided to transfer all his horses to English stables in the morning, as he is entitled to do, the country would be much worse off. He also does an amount for charity behind the scenes. Very few people, outside of the beneficiaries, know this. He does not need or have to do this. It is his money to do what he likes with but some people seem to think he has a moral duty to pay income tax in this state. Let me pose a question: how many people would pay income tax if it was voluntary?  Would there be a rush at the end of the financial year to pay every penny we owe? Of course not but we resent having to pay our share if somebody else, using legitimate means, can reduce their liability or avoid it all together. Why do we always want to screw “people at the top” and try to drag them down to our level? It is simple begrudgery and it is alive and well.  What J.P. has done is great for the development of sport, particularly for our young people and he should be applauded for that. The fact that Limerick are now All-Ireland hurling champions is due in no small part to his sponsorship down through the years. He did not just jump on the bandwagon when things were going well, he was there during the barren years to create the environment where hurling could improve and reach the pinnacle it has today. Look what that success has done for County Limerick. We are all standing a bit taller because of it so thanks and gook luck to J.P. and to hell, with the begrudgers.

 

 

 

On a different theme entirely, we have come to that time of year again when voluntary organisations take stock and hold their AGMs. Athea Community Council Ltd. is one of those and I’m afraid it is in danger of being wound up due to lack of members on the board. Over the years the council has done an amount of work in Athea through the Community Employment schemes it has sponsored. This work includes the footpaths, stone walls, townland signs, the footbridge, the acquisition of the Library and Community Council offices. The village is also kept tidy on a daily basis as the council works closely with the Tidy Towns. We once had a very large and vibrant committee but over the years, due to people getting older and taking well deserved retirement, the numbers have dwindled to the point that there are now just a few trying to keep it going. At the AGM in a few weeks time we will be hoping that some new faces will join us to help carry on our efforts to promote Athea and make it a better place for our children and grandchildren, otherwise we cannot continue and as the old saying goes: “you’ll never miss the water ‘till the well runs dry”

 

 

 

 

 

By Tom Aherne

 

 

 

The Ardagh Chalice 150 festival concluded on Sunday night last after three brilliant weekends of diverse entertainment. It was a festival to celebrate the finding of the Ardagh Chalice on September 17 1868, 150 years ago. It was hosted by St Kieran’s Heritage Association, with support from clubs, organisations, and numerous individuals, who did Trojan work to present such a full program of events. The festival catered for all age groups, which generated an upsurge of community spirit amongst all participants, whose talents shone through in providing entertainment for all who attended the various events. Finally thanks to all who provided sponsorship, looked after social media, guest speakers, and volunteers who gave of their time freely (John and Owen for the Sam Maguire Cup) in supporting the festival. The Heritage Association was founded only two years ago, and by hosting the Fenian Anniversary last year, and the Ardagh Chalice this year they have made a big impact to date.

 

August 2018

LYONS near Listowel.

 

(A)          Photographic Exhibition

 

On Friday August 17th 2018 at 8.30pm the Lyons Photographic Exhibition will be launched at St. John’s Theatre, The Square, Listowel. This is an open invite to all relatives and friends. Anyone who is involved with preparations for this Exhibition knows that it will be a real treat and one not to be missed. We have a fabulous collection of over 130 black and white Lyons photographs displayed in the beautiful setting of St. John’s. This is a FREE public Exhibition, and due to expected interest, will remain open until end of August. All these photographs will also be included in the book to be launched on the 25th August. Free Event.

 

(B)          Banquet at Listowel Arms

 

On Friday August 24th the Banquet will be held at The Listowel Arms Hotel. Cocktail Reception at 7.30. Banquet starts at 8.30. Tickets are available at reception or by email. We are all Lyons descendants and we all need each other to make this a monumental occasion. Tickets cost 55 euro, and for this you will receive a five-course meal which will be followed by entertainment and a night of dance. Please consider buying a ticket and supporting the Lyons Gathering on the night. We really look forward to having a good representation from every branch of the family. Thank You in advance for supporting!

 

(C) The Great House of Lyons: Launch

 

On Saturday August 25th the publication, “The great House of Lyons” will be launched at 12 o’clock at St. John’s Theatre, Listowel. Almost 400 pages, 132 of which are photographs. If you want to hear about all your ancestors and the life and work of the Lyons Family, then this is the event to attend. We are expecting a large attendance at what promises to be a most informative and enjoyable session. Free Event.

 

(D) Irish Music Night

 

 On Saturday Night August 25th starting at 9pm there will be a Lyons Irish night of Fun and Irish Music in Christy’s Bar, The Square, Listowel. This will be a Gathering point for all Lyons Descendants and locals to meet, talk and celebrate as well as perform and share their musical talents with each other. Free Event. 

 

     (E) The Scattering

 

 For those who are still in the Gathering Spirit we are visiting Barretts “Rale McCoy”, Glin on Sunday 26th at 3pm. for a farewell afternoon of music and sheer joy. This is another Lyons family establishment and we expect a reception of boundless comradery and friendship; a fitting finale to a great weekend. The Lyon’s Gathering is your Gathering! Free Event.

 

 

 

Schedule for Lyons Gathering

 

(A)          Photographic Exhibition

 

On Friday August 17th 2018 at 8.30pm the Lyons Photographic Exhibition will be launched at St. John’s Theatre, The Square, Listowel. This is an open invite to all relatives and friends. Anyone who is involved with preparations for this Exhibition knows that it will be a real treat and one not to be missed. We have a fabulous collection of over 130 black and white Lyons photographs displayed in the beautiful setting of St. John’s. This is a FREE public Exhibition, and due to expected interest, will remain open until end of August. All these photographs will also be included in the book to be launched on the 25th August. Free Event.

 

(B)          Banquet at Listowel Arms

 

On Friday August 24th the Banquet will be held at The Listowel Arms Hotel. Cocktail Reception at 7.30. Banquet starts at 8.30. Tickets are available at reception or by email. We are all Lyons descendants and we all need each other to make this a monumental occasion. Tickets cost 55 euro, and for this you will receive a five-course meal which will be followed by entertainment and a night of dance. Please consider buying a ticket and supporting the Lyons Gathering on the night. We really look forward to having a good representation from every branch of the family. Thank You in advance for supporting!

 

(C) The Great House of Lyons: Launch

 

On Saturday August 25th the publication, “The great House of Lyons” will be launched at 12 o’clock at St. John’s Theatre, Listowel. Almost 400 pages, 132 of which are photographs. If you want to hear about all your ancestors and the life and work of the Lyons Family, then this is the event to attend. We are expecting a large attendance at what promises to be a most informative and enjoyable session. Free Event.

 

(D) Irish Music Night

 

 On Saturday Night August 25th starting at 9pm there will be a Lyons Irish night of Fun and Irish Music in Christy’s Bar, The Square, Listowel. This will be a Gathering point for all Lyons Descendants and locals to meet, talk and celebrate as well as perform and share their musical talents with each other. Free Event. 

 

     (E) The Scattering

 

 For those who are still in the Gathering Spirit we are visiting Barretts “Rale McCoy”, Glin on Sunday 26th at 3pm. for a farewell afternoon of music and sheer joy. This is another Lyons family establishment and we expect a reception of boundless comradery and friendship; a fitting finale to a great weekend. The Lyon’s Gathering is your Gathering! Free Event.

 

School Folklore

 

 

 

Ruins of an Old Chapel

 

 

 

There are the ruins of a Chapel on the East side of the hill down by the sea. The walls are as strong as ever, but the roof is gone. It is exactly the same as the chapel on Chapel Island, which is said to have been built by St. Cailín. It is supposed to have been roofed with flat stones.

 

On the floor inside the door is a long, flat tomb-stone on which is written:

 

"PRAY for the soul of Charles Geoghegan who dyed the 8th of Der. 1724. Aged 80. ye. As also his wife, Mary Geoghegan alias Blake who dyed the 6th of Der 1765. Aged 96.

 

Reques e Cant in PAce.

 

Amen."

 

On this page

 

Ruins of an Old Chapel

 

 

 

There are the ruins of a Chapel on the East side of the hill down by the sea. The walls are as strong as ever, but the roof is gone. It is exactly the same as the chapel on Chapel Island, which is said to have been built by St. Cailín. It is supposed to have been roofed with flat stones.

 

On the floor inside the door is a long, flat tomb-stone on which is written:

 

"PRAY for the soul of Charles Geoghegan who dyed the 8th of Der. 1724. Aged 80. ye. As also his wife, Mary Geoghegan alias Blake who dyed the 6th of Der 1765. Aged 96.

 

Reques e Cant in PAce.

 

Amen."

 

Transcribed by a member of our volunteer transcription project.

 

History | Edit »

 

Ruins of an Old Chapel

 

 

 

In the graveyard around the Chapel are two large tomb-stones also. The inscriptions on them are almost obliterated. It is said that when Aillebrack school was being built, limestone slabs were brought from Inishmore, Aran Islands, for the window-sills, corner stones, +c.

 

Canon Lynskey, who was Manager then, detected the inscription on one of the window-sills, so he had it taken down and removed to the old grave-yard one night.

 

Transcribed by a member of our volunteer transcription project.

 

 

 

Collector

 

    A. M. Kennelly

 

Occupation  Teacher Location:  Aillebrack, Co. Galway.

 

 

 

On this page

 

Interference with Graveyards

 

There was a certain man who once drew stones from Kildimo Grave Yard. When the stones were drawn, the door of his house was forced open while the man was in bed. He thought that it was caused by the wind. The following night the same occurrence happened.

 

Then he understood about the stones. He had the stones replaced and from that out nothing unusual happened.

 

Anthony Kennelly, Dunsallagh West.

 

Relator of Story. John Kennelly, Snr. Dunsallagh.

 

Transcribed by a member of our volunteer transcription project.

 

 

 

Collector

 

https://www.duchas.ie/en/ppl/cbes?pretxt=&txt=kennelly

 

 

 

    Anthony Kennelly Gender male. Address  Doonsallagh West, Co. Clare

 

Informant, John Kennelly Gender  Male Address Doonsallagh West, Co. Clare

 

 

 

School: Cill Beathach

 

 

 

Location

 

    Kilbaha Middle, Co. Kerry

 

Teacher

 

    Tomás Ó Ceallacháin

 

(no title)

 

 

 

“There is a fort in Direen and one day Jack Shine and some others went digging it.”

 

 

 

Collector

 

    Bridget Kennelly

 

Informant

 

    Timothy Kennelly

 

“There is a cnocán in Ned Ahearn's field in Direen.”

 

 

 

Collector

 

    Bridget Kennelly

 

Informant

 

    Mrs Kennelly

 

“People usually get married during Lent.”

 

 

 

Collector

 

    Bridget Kennelly

 

Informant

 

    Timothy Kennelly

 

“If a person having the chin cough drank the leavings of a ferret's milk, he would be cured.”

 

 

 

Collector

 

    Bridget Kennelly

 

Informant

 

    Patrick Mc Mahon

 

“Falling soot is a sign of rain.”

 

 

 

Collector

 

    Bridget Kennelly

 

Informant

 

    John Harrington

 

“A great snow storm occurred about forty five years ago on the eleventh of February.”

 

 

 

Collector

 

    Bridget Kennelly

 

Informant

 

    Thomas O' Connor

 

“The longer you live the more you see.”

 

 

 

Collector

 

    Bridget Kennelly

 

Informant

 

    Mrs Kennelly

 

“Michael Shine in Direen used make nails, he is dead about thirty years.”

 

 

 

Language

 

   

 

    Bridget Kennelly

 

Informant

 

    Timothy Kennelly

 

“Mr Hudson was the landlord over Upper Kilbaha and George Kitchenor was the landlord over lower Kilbaha.”

 

 

 

Collector

 

    Bridget Kennelly

 

Informant

 

    John Harrington

 

“There was a house in Timmy Buckley's meadow and Mr Garvey was the name of the man that was living in it.”

 

 

 

Collector

 

    Bridget Kennelly

 

Informant

 

    Timothy Kennelly

 

“People say that it is unlucky to pick flowers or throw out the ashes on May day.”

 

 

 

 

 

Collector

 

    Bridget Kennelly

 

Informant

 

    Mrs Kennelly

 

“The following are the names of our cows.”

 

 

 

Collector

 

    Bridget Kennelly

 

“The following are names for money.”

 

 

 

 

 

Collector

 

    Bridget Kennelly

 

“The name of our home district is Kilbaha.”

 

 

 

 

 

Collector

 

    Bridget Kennelly

 

Informant

 

    Timothy Kennelly

 

“When people take messages from a shopkeeper without paying for them when they are buying them, that is called ticking.”

 

 

 

Collector

 

    Bridget Kennelly

 

“Each year in the winter time some of the potato crop is selected and stored for the coming year to plant.”

 

 

 

Collector

 

    Bridget Kennelly

 

Informant

 

    Timothy Kennelly

 

“The children in this district play different games.”

 

 

 

Collector

 

    Bridget Kennelly

 

“The following are the names of wild birds: The wren, the cuckoo...”

 

 

 

Collector

 

    Bridget Kennelly

 

“The cuckoo comes to this country about the end of July.”

 

 

 

Collector

 

    Bridget Kennelly

 

Proverbs

 

 

 

Collector

 

    Bridget Kennelly

 

 

 

Listowel School Boys, Toys and Playthings

 

 

 

Collector,  James Kennelly Informant,   C. Kennelly.

 

 

 

School: Cluain Meacan

 

 

 

Location

 

    Cloonmackon, Co. Kerry

 

Teacher

 

    Liam Ó Catháin

 

A Funny Story

 

 

 

Collector

 

    Cahal Kennelly

 

Informant

 

    Jack Twomey

 

A Ghost Story

 

 

 

Collector

 

    Cahal Kennelly

 

Informant

 

    John Shanahan

 

 

 

A Funny Story

 

 

 

 

 

Collector

 

    Cahal Kennelly

 

Informant

 

    Pat Shanahan

 

An Accident

 

 

 

 

 

Collector

 

    Cahal Kennelly

 

Informant

 

    John Shanahan

 

 

 

Local Heroes

 

 

 

 

 

Collector

 

    Cahal Kennelly

 

Informant

 

    Jenny Histon, Age 50.

 

 

 

 

 

Collector

 

    Cahal Kennelly

 

Informant  William Keane Age 48

 

 

 

Hidden Treasure

 

 

 

Collector

 

    Cathal Kennelly

 

Informant

 

    John Shanahan

 

 

 

Local Heroes

 

 

 

Collector

 

    Cathal Kennelly

 

Informant

 

    Thomas O Sullivan Age  45

 

 

 

School: Askanagap

 

 

 

Location

 

    Askanagap, Co. Wicklow

 

Teacher

 

    Sorcha Ní Oichir 7 Síle Ní Chatháin

 

 

 

Beliefs

 

Informant

 

    Guard Kennelly

 

 

 

School: Listowel (B.)

 

 

 

Location

 

    Listowel, Co. Kerry

 

Teacher

 

    Brian Mac Mathúna

 

Funny Stories

 

 

 

Collector

 

    P. Kennelly

 

Informant

 

    J. Kennelly

 

Ghost Stories

 

 

 

Collector

 

    J. Kennelly

 

Informant

 

    J. Kennelly

 

“A very remarkable thing about the grouse is that when the eggs are hatched and opened...”

 

 

 

Collector

 

    James Kennelly

 

Informant

 

    J. Kennelly

 

Lore of Certain Days

 

 

 

Collector

 

    James Kennelly

 

Informant

 

    J. Kennelly

 

Local Cures

 

 

 

Collector

 

    Jim Kennelly

 

Informant

 

    J.J. Kennelly Age 45

 

“Over 30 years ago this town used to have a visit from a man named Madigan.”

 

 

 

Collector

 

    James Kennelly

 

Informant

 

    John Kennelly Age   59

 

Forts

 

 

 

Collector

 

    James Kennelly

 

Informant

 

    John Kennelly Age  50

 

Mulvihill and Nolan, Listowel Parish

 

https://www.irelandxo.com/ireland/kerry/listowel-kerry/message-board/mulvihill-and-nolan-listowel-parish

 

 

 

I have been researching my family and am looking for any further genealogical information, including any living relatives that currently reside in Ireland.

 

 

 

Following is all the information that I have. Daniel Mulvihill and Honora Walsh would be my ggg-grandparents, Mary Mulvihill and Michael Nolan my gg-grandparents and William J. Nolan was my great-grandfather.

 

 

 

*Daniel Mulvihill m Honora Walsh, Ireland

 

 

 

= Mary Mulvihill b 29 May 1824, Gortdromasilliha, baptized @ Listowel Parish m Michael Nolan (Noulin)

 

 

 

   of Lakabee 1 Mar 1840 @ Ballybunion Parish; emigrated to USA 1850-1852

 

 

 

===John Nolan (Noalan) b 1841, Kielbuie, baptized 21 Apr 1841 Listowel Parish, d 1891 in New York, USA

 

 

 

===Margaret Nolan b 1843 in Ireland, d 1924 in New York, USA

 

 

 

===Cassy Nolan b 1845 in Ireland, d 1860 in New York, USA

 

 

 

===Michael Nolan b 1847 in Ireland

 

 

 

===Peter Nolan b 1848 in Ireland, d 1905 in New York, USA

 

 

 

===Thomas Nolan b 1849 in Ireland, d 1920 in Texas, USA

 

 

 

===Catherine Nolan b 1850, Kiolbee, baptized 18 Nov 1850 @ Listowel Parish

 

 

 

===William J Nolan b 1855 in New York, USA, d 1918 in California, USA

 

 

 

===Daniel D Nolan b 1859 in New York, USA, d 1932

 

 

 

===Charles J Nolan b 1861 in New York, USA, d 1901

 

 

 

= Ellen Mulvihill b 21 Oct 1826, Gortdromasillahy, baptized Listowel Parish, m John James 1848,

 

 

 

   emigrated to USA 1850-1852

 

 

 

= John Mulvihill b 15 May 1829

 

 

 

= Honora Mulvihill b 20 Mar 1831

 

 

 

= James Mulvihill b 28 Aug 1834

 

 

 

= Patrick Mulvihill b 18 Apr 1837

 

 

 

Any information or suggestions would be appreciated. My father was an only child and the only grandchild on the Nolan side and I have no knowledge of living relatives from whom I could acquire further information.

 

 

 

Thank you,

 

 

 

Sheri Nolan Wells

 

An Irish Missionary

 

New Zealand Tablet, Volume XXXIII, Issue 26, 29 June 1905, Page 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The missionaries in Shanghai are mostly of French nationality, a few countrymen of the saintly martyr of Molokai, and one worthy son of St. Patrick. The Rev. F. M. Kennelly, S.J., was born about forty years ago at Listowel, North Kerry, and belongs to a highly respected family still represented there. One of his brothers is parish priest at Clunes, Victoria. (Father Kennelly of Clunes is a personal friend of the editor of the N.Z. Tablet). Two members of the family are Sisters of Mercy in Sacramento, Cal., and two brothers reside in New York. Father Kennelly, like the saintly Brendan of Clonfert, was early imbued with the missionary spirit. He came to China in 1885, and has not seen the land of his birth since. He was ordained a priest in 1890 and had been engaged for six years teaching in Shanghai. The field of his missionary activity is immense and also extends to visiting men-o-war, hospitals, prisons, police stations, and the many other arduous duties of a priest, which are known only to himself and Almighty God. From his busy life, however, he snatches moments to contribute articles to the local press and the New York Messenger. His name is on every tongue from Hong Kong to Chefoo, and many a poor, hard-up sailor he has befriended. Being an eminent lingiuist, speaking French, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, and several Chinese dialects he still is proud of the Gaelic tongue of his beloved Eire, which he regards as an invaluable auxiliary in the acquisition of languages. Father Kennelly is rather difficult to catch, but if you happen to be occasionally lucky you are introduced to a plain room with a bare floor, a crucifix on the wall, a picture of our Lady, a portrait of the Pope, a few books on a shelf, a secretaire, and the only other chair in the room is offered you with a hearty cead mile failte. Though a little beyond the prime of life and a few silvery hairs discernible, the intellect and vigor of the Gael is at once apparent in the ample forehead, the firm lips and chin, the hearty hand shake, the natural smile, the twinkling, kindly eye, the sympathetic expressions of the priestly heart, and the magnetic versatility polished by culture and the touches of that rich accent alone peculiar to those born under the shadows of the hills that inspired vigor and eloquence in The Liberator. Father Kennelly intends shortly to publish, probably in the New York Messenger, an interesting history of the Catholic missions in China, which promises to be a literary as well as a historical treat.

 

 

 

 NOTES on Local people

 

Martin Mulvihill (born in Ballygoughlin, County Limerick, Ireland in 1919; died 21 July 1987) was an Irish traditional musician, composer, teacher, and author. He composed roughly 25 tunes in the Irish traditional style. Although his mother played the fiddle, Martin, the youngest of her ten children, was the only one to become a musician. He began his study of music at the age of nine. From a violin player in the neighboring town of Glin, he learned the rudiments of the fiddle and how to read and write music; from his mother he learned the Irish traditional style. His early repertoire was learned both from written sources such as Roche, Ker, and O’Neill's 1001, and from local musicians. In 1951 he emigrated to Northampton, England; there he married Olive McEvoy from County Offaly, with whom he had his four children, Brendan, Brian, Gail, and Dawn. Mulvihill continued playing music during this time, expanding his skills to include button accordion and piano accordion. The latter became his main instrument for several years. In 1965 the Mulvihill family relocated to New York City. He began teaching music lessons part-time, but as his reputation grew this quickly became his full-time ( Wikipedia article )

 

 

Irish Dance Master and long time Kings Park resident Jerry Mulvihill, has passed away. was 92 when he died 9th August 2013.

 

Jerry was born in 1921 in Moyvane, County Kerry. He took his first steps in Irish dancing at the age of four from dance master, Joe Enright. He later took lessons from the famous Kerry dancer, Jerry Molyneaux. In 1948, At age 17 he won the Irish national championship in stepdancing. Jerry emigrated to the United States where he settled in New York City and then in 1969 to Kings Park, LI. . his brother persuaded him to stay in New York.

Jerry is survived by his sister Liza age 98 who now resides at St Ita’s and was predeceased by siblings Mick, William, Paddy, Martin, Mary, Lena and Hannie, they were First Cousin to the great musician Martin Mulvihill of Glin. Funeral mass was held at St. Joseph RC Church on Church Street in Kings Park.

 

Jerry has taught youngsters of all ages including Donny Golden, who taught Jean Butler of Riverdance fame. Like other master stepdancers Jerry prefers "the old style

 

Pat’s Corner-17/10/12

by Domhnall De Barra under News

Songs Our Father’s Loved

The recent death of that great singer of the ‘60’s, and later, Larry Cunningham brought back memories of some of the songs he used to sing. Who could ever forget “Lovely Leitrim” or “Among the Wicklow Hills” and the magic that enthralled us when after our return home after several years working and living abroad we came to an Ireland that had a renewed spirit of affluence and confidence after a taste of the new industrial revolution that had come about during the era of Sean Lemass as Taoiseach.

New factories were springing up all over the country and new jobs were being created and the country, or at least much of it, was experiencing a period of hope for the future. The 26 County State which had been renamed The Republic of Ireland back in 1949 was an Independent, Sovereign State and was also solvent which meant that it was not indebted to any other country or financial institutions. At the time that we came back in 1957 the country was booming, the coming war and troubles in the Six Counties had not yet started. The divisive issue of membership of the Common Market had not yet surfaced and generally the country was more prosperous than it had ever been. In other words it was a country worth coming home to after years in exile. Television had arrived and was being celebrated with some great songs by the singing stars at the time Larry Cunningham, Bridie Gallagher, Dickie Rock, Margo O’Donnell, Sean Dunphy and several others. In 1967 Sean Dunphy was awarded 2nd place in the European Song Contest with that super and unforgettable song based on the Hills of Clare “If I Could Choose”. Sandy Shaw won the contest on the same night with that lively number “Puppet on a String”. After that came Dana with her song that won the Eurovision, the first native Irish singer to do so.

The troubles in the North generated its own quota of new songs “The Town I Loved so Well” and tens of thousands of Northern Nationalists clapped their hands and tapped their feet to the rousing beat of “The Men Behind The Wire”. In the meantime several new singing groups had emerged The Dubliners, The Chieftains, The Woulfe Tones, The Feury’s, Foster and Allen, The Horseslips, The Saw Doctors and many others all bringing their own brand of entertainment to the scene. Then of course there was the era of the Showband scene and the Ballrooms of Romance in various parts of the country which brought the different generations together. There was as well during this period a great revival of traditional songs, music, recitations, storytelling, set-dancing, céilí dancing and step-dancing all fostered and promoted by Comhaltas Ceoltóirí Éireann a cultural organisation which was formed in the mid ‘50’s to promote interest in our native traditions and culture which at that time were in danger of dying out unless steps were taken to reverse this trend. How successful the Comhaltas and its organisers and members were in this direction can be judged by the huge numbers who attend a County, Provincial and All- Ireland Fleadh Cheoil each year. All these traditional and native Irish pastimes have been brought to the highest level as the evidence from the various competitions show. Some of the great old songs, stories and dances have all been revived just like one of the poems we learned in our schooldays called “The Songs Our Father’s Loved”. The first lines of this lovely poem were “oh, sing them on the sunny hills when days are long and bright” and then another line went like this “and sing them on the misty moor where ancient waters roared”. Comhaltas not alone provided the revival of the old songs it also encouraged the composition of new songs. It was in this competition that some of us were mostly involved during our time and we must hope that our sons, daughters and our grandchildren can at some future time look back and be able to say that these were some of the songs that our father’s loved. While on the subject of song composers George Langan rang me up a few days ago and during the course of our conversation he informed me that some of the songs on his CD’s have been requested in Australia and the songs recorded by George on these discs (his own and other composers songs) will be broadcast on Radio in that far off land. Congratulations and well done to George on this high profile achievement.

 

 

Tribute To Paddy Faley

 

By George Langan

 

My heart it did break when the sad news it leaked

That the ‘Great Bard,’ he had just fallen

His loss I deplore, for I’ll never see more

My guide, my true inspiration.

He was that tall mast, a link with the past

His works, they were so much sought after

Now on history’s page, they will sing the high praise

Of this genius, the poetic master.

 

Equally strong, be it prose, verse or song

With a brain that was ever so fruitful

And his poems and his rhymes, were ever sublime

And for that, I will always be grateful.

Incessantly there, always eager to share

The ways, of our loving ancestors

And each story he told, I’ve indexed in bold

For to help out, and aid the researcher.

 

On the bare mountainside, he grew up with pride

With his kin, that he loved oh! so dearly

I’ll name them at will; there was Mick, Dan and Bill,

Young Joe, and their sister Mary.

Soon a family man, with a young wife and clan,

Glenbawn to the east came a callin’,

Moved there to reside, reared their daughters, all five,

When the good Lord took Mum, away from them.

 

So sleep long and hard, dear friend, ‘Greatest Bard’

Beside those, who have long since departed

And ‘though your pathway of life, brought you much pain and strife

For that, you’ll be richly rewarded.

If it’s a prayer that you need, then I’ll do that deed

I’ll go on my knees, twice daily

For it gave me such pride, just to stand by the side

Of the poet, the great Paddy Faley.

 

  2011 Aug.

Congratulations to Gearóid and Kevin Brudair who are making a name for themselves in Horse and Pony racing. These two young men from Listowel are grandsons of Mary Brouder in Knocknaclugga, their father being Gerard Brouder RIP. Between them they rode five winners at the Ballabuidhe races in Dunmanway recently.

 

Rose: Orla Tobin from Abbeyfeale won the title in 2003. Orla, who represented Dublin, is the daughter of Mattie Tobin. Her grandfather Dan owned the local cinema and her grand uncle Tom was the legendary owner of Tobin’s Dance Hall in the town.

 

 

 Aug. 2011; Eddie Stack native of Duagh, Co Kerry, a 22year-old who graduated from UCC in September of last year with a degree in maths and economics, won the Irish Universities Championship in 2007 becomes the first Kerry man to play on the provincial team since Killarney's Dan Sugrue 10 years ago

Message: Hello - My Ggrandmother was Mary Mulvihill.  I think she was
born @ 1854 or so. Her parents were Patrick Mulvihill and Mary Connell
(I think). According to oral family history, there is a connection to
Knockanure. Perhaps Mary was born there? She had a brother named
Michael (who later married Mary Reagan) and a sister Bridget (who
married Edward Hanlon). Mary married Timothy Mangan in The Church of
the Immaculate Conception in Glin @ 1884 or so.

If you have any information on this family, I would love to hear back
from you.

Thanks so much.

Elizabeth

 

From: < PTOCONNOR@aol.com>
Subject: [O'Connor/Var] Asdee, Co. Kerry names
Date: Sun, 20 Feb 2000 03:16:25 EST


"From Craughdarrig to Asdee (From the Recollections of the late Matt Enright,
recorded in 1960)" THE SHANNONSIDE JOURNAL, 1994, by the Shannonside Journal
Committee, page 122:

Going over the road from Craughdarrig to Asdee, you first meet Kelly's old
house. There has always been a house there as at Collin's next door as long
as people remember. Across the road from Collins' there was once a house
owned by Ned Ristard. I never heard another surname for him. The cottages
over the road were built in my time going to school. There was once a house
beyond the cottage on the left hand side of the road owned by Ned a'
Bhothair. I never saw that house, but the place continued to be called Drain
a' Bhothair and was held to be haunted.

The next house on the same side over the road was Cantys. That same family
seem to have occupied the house until eventually they all went to America. It
was a thatched house and a great haunt of children mitching from school.

Keefe's house across the road was originally built by the Hickey landlords.
It was occupied by the Mick Connor family originally. That family came up
from the strand. Any other houses down the hill to the village were not there
in my time. At the western side of the Asdee bridge and on the left was a
house where the Collins family, later of the cottage, were born. Their father
was a weaver. Across the river on the same side lived Thadeen Gorman and his
wife, Maine Moran. There were steps leading down to the house. They were
caretakers of the village pump. Maine sold apples, but since she was fairly
blind she made sure the schoolchildren stayed outside the half door lest they
pinch the apples. Across the road from that was a shoemaker named John
English, where Mike Walsh later lived. Across the road at the passageway into
Kissanes today were two houses, one owned by John Dalton and the other by a
woman whose name I can't recall, but who bought kid goats for sixpence each,
skinned them and hung them up, I presume for sale.

Kissane's house, a public house, came next. Next to that came Pat Moore's, a
baker. Moore also ran the post office in his house. You had to call there for
your mail. The post office later moved to McMahon's next door. McMahon was a
cooper. His son Matt was the church clerk, in which position he was later
succeeded by Mickie Walsh, who also took the post office to his house across
the road. Next door to McMahon's was Connor's shop, later to become Mahony's
when Dick Mahony married in there. It is now a public house. Mickie Walsh's
across the road was the old village schoolhouse from 1835 until 1872 when the
present schoolhouse was built. It is now the post office. Next door to the
post office was a thatched shop owned by Johanna O'Connor. It was there all
the O'Connors, including teachers and priests, were reared. The O'Connor's
originally came from Dingle. The first of them, Patsy, was a teacher. His
sons, Patsy and Batty, were also teachers, who taught in Asdee and Tarbert
and Ballylongford. Batty especially was reckoned to have been a powerful
teacher who made scholars of the young people of Asdee. He boasted a BA
degree when such was a rarity in a country school. It was in that house that
the priest from Ballylongford always ate breakfast after Mass in Asdee chapel
and where he always heard confessions before Mass. There were no confessions
in Asdee church until about 1919, when quarterly confessions were introduced
at the church. Up to then confessions were usually heard at the spring and
autumn stations in the houses and communion was also not very frequent.

There was a story about the old chapel in Asdee. It appears that something
caused the congregation to panic during a midnight Mass in the chapel. They
felt they were being surrounded by some strange manifestation. Some believed
they were surrounded by their dead that night. There was a story told of a
needle being found in someone's clothing afterwards. The needle had last been
in the possession of someone drowned in Beal Strand.

Across the road from the chapel was Robin Cahill's, later Kissane's, later
Buckley's, a later Fitzgerald's. Over the road past the school and the
teachers houses was Hannie Shea's cottage. Hannie was an O'Connor home from
America. Her father died in his canoe while herring fishing on the Shannon.
Down the small road from Hannie's was Mulvihill's where there was always a
house as long as could be remembered. Nearby in Snugboro lived at one time
the James family. The local tradition linked them up with Jessie James. Then
there is the Blessed Well, around which there were a number of houses at one
time. From here to the shore there were said to have been twenty four
households evicted to make room for one farm. I saw houses at the White Gates
along the shore. The Kirby's, Flavins, Keanes, Gormans and Connors lived
there in a laneway along by the tide. Only the sign of their haggards are
there now. On the left hand side of the Bunow River, coming up from the
shore, you had Mulvhill's before you came to Hanlons. The corner going up to
Hanlons was called Ulick's Corner, so some Ulick or other must have once
lived there. Hanlon's, Donoghue's and Mulvihill's were once the property of a
landowner called Mayne, who went burst. The Collin's from Ballylongford moved
in and later Jim Connor from Knockanure. The Halons came from Ballyduff, the
Mulvihills came from Glin. Cox's house at the top of the road was there as
long a can be remembered.

Coming back the road to Asdee, Scanlon's was there a long time too and Mickie
Dwane's across the road. Carr's is another old house. Murphy's also. Lacey, a
tailor from Listowel, came in more recent times. The other houses from there
to the village are more recent also.

Coming back west of the village again, there is the small road leading down
to Connors, Moss Jimeen Mahony's and the other Mahony's below. When I was
going to school a young lad from that Connors house died while he was in
third class. He was an Irish speaker, having learned Irish from his
grandmother in that house from the cradle. She hardly spoke anything else but
Irish and was a very old woman when she died. Her own name was Wren and that
was always a Wren house until Jack Connor married in. They were no connection
of the Littor Wrens, until they intermarried. It was the last native speaking
household in Asdee. The Asdee Races took place around their house. I never
saw the Asdee Races, but I always heard the old crowd speak of the Asdee
Races.

Below Wren's was Moss Jimeen Mahony's and the other Mahony's below them
again. They were all related. From the lower house came Dick Mahony who
married Maynie Connor of the O'Connor shop in Asdee village, which changed
its name to Mahony with his coming.

P.S. It has since reverted to the same O'Connor family again, but this time
better known as Jesse James.

Based on recordings by Neal O'Keeffe.

 

 The death has occurred of Sr. Baptist Kennelly of North Presentation Convent, Gerald Griffin Street, Cork and Skibbereen on November 26, 2006, Requiem Mass at the Cathedral. for Sr. Baptist Kennelly on Tuesday Nov. 27th `06. Funeral afterwards to St Catherine's Cemetery, Kilcully.

 

 

documenting the period 1/12/1846 - 12/31/1851
INDEX


KENNELLY MAGT. age 21 Ireland USA LIVERPOOL JESSICA 004 08-14-1849 361 08/14/1849 KENNELLY MARTIN age 24 Ireland USA DUBLIN GENERAL SCOTT 059 11-14-1849 113 11/14/1849 KENNELLY CATHERINE age 28 Ireland USA DUBLIN GENERAL SCOTT 059 11-14-1849 113 11/14/1849 KENNELLY ROBERT age 28 Ireland USA LIMERICK HANNAH 134 06-07-1850 065 06/07/1850 KENNELLY MARY age 28 Ireland USA LIMERICK HANNAH 134 06-07-1850 065 06/07/1850 KENNELLY BRIDGET age 20 Ireland USA LIMERICK MARIA BRENNAN 134 06-08-1850 101 06/08/1850 KENNELLY WM. age 13 Great Britain USA LIMERICK BARCO 134 07-10-1850 120 07/10/1850 KENNELLY MICHAEL age 23 Great Britain USA LIMERICK ELLEN FORRESTAL 134 09-19-1850 094 09/19/1850



KENNELLY JOSEPH age 30 Great Britain USA LIVERPOOL ATLAS 004 10-02-1850 387 10/02/1850 KENNELLY MARY age 26 Great Britain USA LIVERPOOL ATLAS 004 10-02-1850 387 10/02/1850 KENNELLY FRANCIS age 09 Great Britain USA LIVERPOOL ATLAS 004 10-02-1850 387 10/02/1850 KENNELLY SARAH age 05 Great Britain USA LIVERPOOL ATLAS 004 10-02-1850 387 10/02/1850 KENNELLY CATHARINE age 20 Great Britain USA LIVERPOOL ATLAS 004 10-02-1850 387 10/02/1850 KENNELLY PEGGY age 52 Ireland USA LIVERPOOL HOME 004 01-02-1851 250 01/02/1851 KENNELLY JAMES age 22 Ireland USA LIVERPOOL HOME 004 01-02-1851 250 01/02/1851 KENNELLY PAT age 14 Ireland USA LIVERPOOL HOME 004 01-02-1851 250 01/02/1851 KENNELLY BRIDGET age 16 Ireland USA LIVERPOOL HOME 004 01-02-1851 250 01/02/1851 KENNELLY DANL. age 20 Ireland USA LIVERPOOL HOME 004 01-02-1851 250 01/02/1851



KENNELLY THOMAS age 12 Ireland USA LIVERPOOL HOME 004 01-02-1851 250 01/02/1851 KENNELLY ELLEN age 10 Ireland USA LIVERPOOL HOME 004 01-02-1851 250 01/02/1851 KENNELLY PATK. age 08 Ireland USA LIVERPOOL HOME 004 01-02-1851 250 01/02/1851 KENNELLY JOHN age 20 Ireland USA LIVERPOOL LOCHMABEN CASTLE 004 04-19-1851 347 04/19/1851 KENNELLY CATH. age 20 Great Britain USA TRALEE TORONTO 158 05-07-1851 154 05/07/1851 KENNELLY BRIDGET age 25 Ireland USA DUBLIN BRITISH QUEEN 059 06-18 1851 244 06/18/1851 KENNELLY JNO. age 20 Great Britain USA LIVERPOOL SCIOTA 004 09-05-1851 220 09/05/1851 KENNELLY MIKE age 10 Great Britain USA LIVERPOOL HARMONY 004 04-16-1847 199 04/16/1847 KENNELLY CATHE. age 02 Great Britain USA LIVERPOOL HARMONY 004 04-16-1847 199 04/16/1847 KENNELLY MARY age 08 Great Britain USA LIVERPOOL HARMONY 004 04-16-1847 199 04/16/1847




KENNELLY CATHE. age 38 Great Britain USA LIVERPOOL HARMONY 004 04-16-1847 199 04/16/1847 KENNELLY MARY age 28 Great Britain USA LIVERPOOL HENRY CLAY 004 04-26-1847 433 04/26/1847 KENNELLY WILLIAM age 27 Ireland USA LIVERPOOL FIDELIA 004 10-06-1847 185 10/06/1847 KENNELLY JOHANA age 20 Ireland USA LIVERPOOL HIGHLAND MARY 004 03-23-1848 153 03/23/1848 KENNELLY JANE age 24 Ireland NEW-YORK LIVERPOOL ST. PATRICK 004 05-05-1848 259 05/05/1848 KENNELLY JOHANA age 30 Ireland USA CORK BRIDGET 046 05-29-1848 097 05/29/1848 KENNELLY JOHANNA age 03 Ireland USA LIMERICK HARRIET NEWELL 134 11-30-1848 120 11/30/1848 KENNELLY JOHN age 50 Ireland USA LIVERPOOL COLUMBUS 004 02-26-1849 542 02/26/1849 KENNELLY JOHN age 56 Ireland USA LIMERICK MONTREAL OF NY 134 06-30-1849 196 06/30/1849 KENNELLY JOLEN age 25 Ireland CHARLESTON LIVERPOOL A.Z. 004 09-15-1849 174 09/15/1849



KENNELLY WILLIAM age 19 Ireland USA LIVERPOOL WATERLOO 004 04-08-1850 312 04/08/1850 KENNELLY JAMES age 30 Great Britain USA LIVERPOOL ATLAS 004 10-02-1850 387 10/02/1850 KENNELLY JOHN age 25 Ireland USA LIVERPOOL MARMIOM 004 02-22-1851 278 02/22/1851 KENNELLY MICHL. age 20 Ireland NEW-YORK LIVERPOOL WATERLOO 004 03-04-1851 302 03/04/1851 KENNELLY MARTIN age 25 Ireland USA LIVERPOOL AUSTRALIA 004 05-15-1851 368 05/15/1851 KENNELLY PATRICK age 23 Ireland USA LIVERPOOL AUSTRALIA 004 05-15-1851 368 05/15/1851 KENNELLY MAURICE age 21 Great Britain USA LIMERICK & LIVERPOOL BELVEDERE 296 05-24-1851 108 05/24/1851 KENNELLY JAMES age 50 Great Britain USA LIVERPOOL NEW BRUNSWICK 004 05-31-1851 369 05/31/1851 KENNELLY MARY age 19 Ireland USA GALWAY IRVINE 035 09-18-1851 229 09/18/1851 KENNELLY TIMOTHY age 29 Ireland BOSTON LIVERPOOL GUY MANNERING 004 09-25-1851 569 09/25/1851


View Record LAST NAME FIRST NAME AGE NATIVE COUNTRY CODE DESTINATION PASSENGER PORT OF EMBARKATION CODE MANIFEST IDENTIFICATION NUMBER PASSENGER ARRIVAL DATE KENNELLY MARGT. age 54 Ireland BROOKLYN LIVERPOOL WESTERN WORLD 004 10-13-1851 559 10/13/1851 KENNELLY JAS. age 20 Great Britain USA CORK LOCKWOOD 046 10-15-1851 278 10/15/1851 KENNELLY CATHERINE age 22 Ireland USA LIMERICK LADY PEEL 134 10-15-1851 058 10/15/1851 KENNELLY SAM age 20 Ireland USA LIMERICK LADY PEEL 134 10-15-1851 058 10/15/1851 KENNELLY JOHN age 35 Ireland NEW-YORK LIVERPOOL ST. PATRICK 004 05-05-1848 259 05/05/1848


Whites of Athea
Father was James White born 1913 Athea. Had brothers, Thomas and John (known as Jack) and sisters Bridget (known as Delia), Mary, Christina (died age 21)and Catherine - don't know what happened to her. They were the children of Thomas White and Mary Hunt(who came from Knockanure, Kerry, daughter of James Hunt). Thomas was the son of Thomas White and Bridget White - he was born around 1865.

 

Connell-Sullivan.
Cornelius Sullivan aged 40 and wife Johanna Connell aged 35 left Limerick in 1873 with 4 sons and 2 daughters for Australia. Possibly lived in or near Athea. Occupation given as Farmer. Would appreciate any information and contact with relatives.

 

 

 

 

Pierce Charles de Lacy O'Mahony
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Pierce[1] Charles de Lacy O'Mahony (June 9, 1850 - October 31, 1930), known up to 1901 as Pierce Mahony, and from 1912 also as The O'Mahony of Kerry,[2] was an Irish Protestant nationalist philanthropist, politician and MP, in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland as member of the Irish Parliamentary Party. He practised as a barrister from 1898 to 1900. He was remarkable in having had successively three names, two wives and three faiths. He was honoured by the Kings of two opposing countries in the Great War. He should not be confused with his grandfather Pierce Mahony (1792-1853), a close associate of Daniel O'Connell, who was elected as MP for Kinsale in 1837 but unseated on petition; or with his son Pierce Gun Mahony (1878-1914).


[edit] Early life
Born in Dublin to a Church of Ireland family, Mahony was the only surviving son of Peirce Kenifeck Mahony of Kilmorna, Duagh, Co. Kerry, and of Jane, daughter of Robert Gun Cuninghame, D.L., of Mount Kennedy, Co. Wicklow. His father died shortly after he was born. When he was six his mother married Col. William Henry Vicars, and the family moved to Leamington, Warwickshire. Mahony was educated at Rugby School and at Magdalen College, Oxford, where he did not take a degree, but established an Irish Home Rule club and formed a friendship with his later Parliamentary colleague J. G. Swift MacNeill. Mahony went on to the Royal Agricultural College, Cirencester, where he won the Haygarth Gold Medal in 1875. In 1877 he married Helen Louise, only daughter of Maurice Collis, a member of the Royal Irish Academy. She died in 1899 and in 1901 he married a first cousin, Alice Johnstone, who died in her turn in 1906. In 1913, his son Dermot O'Mahony married Grace Hill.

Mahony was an Assistant Land Commissioner 1881-84, a magistrate in Co. Kerry and Co. Limerick, Poor Law Guardian at Listowel, a member of the Roads and Piers Commission under the Relief of Distress Act 1886, and a member of the Royal Commission on Market Rights and Tolls.


[edit] Irish nationalism
He was elected unopposed as Member of Parliament for North Meath in the July 1886 general election. When the Irish Parliamentary Party split over Parnell's leadership in 1890, Mahony was one of the four Protestant MPs who supported Parnell. He remained close to Parnell, entertaining him in Kerry shortly before he died.[3] At the general election of 1892, he was defeated in North Meath by the prominent land campaigner Michael Davitt, who had taken a particularly strong and clericalist line against Parnell from early in the crisis, by 54% to 46%. This general election was characterised by ferocious hostility to the Parnellites on the part of the Catholic Church. Mahony successfully petitioned the courts to set aside the result on the basis of clerical intimidation of the voters. In the re-run election in February 1893, Davitt did not stand, having been elected unopposed to a vacancy at Cork North East. However clerical Anti-Parnellite influence continued to be strong. The Times reported that ‘the priests...swarmed at all the polling stations, and kept the voters constantly in view'.[4] Mahony again lost, by the fractionally smaller margin of 53% to 47%.

Mahony remained active in the Nationalist movement, and made three further unsuccessful attempts to return to Parliament. He stood as Parnellite candidate for Dublin St Stephen's Green at a by-election in September 1895 but failed to unseat the Liberal Unionist member, William Kenny. He contested another by-election, for Dublin Harbour, in 1915 but came well short of election with 24% of the vote. In the general election of 1918 he fought West Wicklow for the Irish Parliamentary Party but lost to the Sinn Féin candidate Robert Barton by the particularly wide margin of more than four to one.


[edit] Later career
In 1898 Mahony was called to the Irish bar, and subsequently practised as a barrister. In 1900 he inherited an estate from an uncle and thereafter did not need paid work, instead devoting himself to philanthropy. In 1903 O'Mahony travelled to Bulgaria to undertake relief work among orphans who had fled from Turkish massacres, and in 1904 opened St Patrick's Orphanage in Sofia. On the outbreak of World War I in 1914, he unsuccessfully tried to prevent Bulgaria entering alliance with Germany, and after the war argued for Bulgaria to be exempted from war reparations. On Jan 20, 1915, he was awarded the Order of Civil Merit by Ferdinand I of Bulgaria.

In 1913, O'Mahony supported the workers led by James Larkin in the Dublin Lockout. During the First World War he served as a member of the Irish Recruiting Council for Irish regiments. For this work he was awarded a C.B.E. in 1920, but declined it. Later in the year and resigned as Deputy Lieutenant of County Wicklow and as a magistrate in protest against British policy in the Irish War of Independence then in progress.

While in Bulgaria, O'Mahony had joined the Bulgarian Orthodox Church, but he remained also a member of the Church of Ireland until 1927 when a new Rector forced him to choose between the religions. He then became a Catholic, in 1929, the year before his death.

His son Dermot O'Mahony (1881-1960) was a Cumann na nGaedhael member of the Dáil of the Irish Free State for County Wicklow in 1927-38.

 




Republican and a past pupil of St. Brendan's, Jerry Lyons, who was killed near Knockanure in 1921 having surrendered to British soldiers at Gort an Ghleanna.

I found this about Maurice Hennessy aged 26 died at Tralee barricks on 30th of August 1846 after a fight in the barricks, he just collapsed acording to his brother he was 8 months in the army and a married man and native of Listowel.
He died from heart arrest caused by passion. Michael was his brothers name.



DEATH has taken place of Sr. Johanna Leahy of the Daughters of Mary and Joseph she was born at Beenanasbig on the 23rd of November 1916 to Tim Leahy and Bell Danaher of Glenagore, her siblings include Tim, Paddy, Tom, Dan, Philip, Betty, Bea and Josie.. Sr. Johanna went to Athea National School, went by train from Kilmorna to Secondary school in Lixnaw from September 1932 to July 1934; attended the Convent of the Ladies of Mary, Scarborough, Yorkshire completed Leaving Cert in July 1936; came home July 1936 till she entered Noviciate of the Ladies of Mary, Forest Hill, London in February 1937 where she made First Profession in September 1938, Johanna continued her noviciate in Belgium at Noviciat des Dames de Marie, 140 Rue Edith Cavell, Bruxeiles'38-‘39; returning to Forest Hill, London August 1939 for Final Profession; sailed for America in 1940 to the convent at Rancho Palos Verde's, California. Sr. Johanna Leahy died at the convent of the Daughters of Mary and Joseph, 5300 Crest Road, Rancho Palos Verde's, Laos Angeles, California 90275 and was laid to rest on Monday18th of September 2006.

 

 

 

NORA KELLY

 

The untimely death of Nora Kelly nee Kennelly occurred in Nenagh General Hospital on April 26th 05. Her husband Liam, the Kelly and Kennelly family maintained a 24-hour vigil at her bedside. In the beginning hopes were high of her recovery but the end came suddenly. Nora was active and full of life prior to her admission to hospital. Nora was the youngest of a family of 11 children born to Patrick Kennelly and Mary Daly of Gortdromagowna Moyvane.

Nora was a former student of the Presentation Convent Listowel. Nora went on to further her education in Tralee Dublin and London. She was a fluent French speaker. A month before her death she was successful in an interview for Assistant Principle in the Civil Service. Her work colleagues held Nora in very high esteem. This was very evident by their presence both at the Church and the funeral home.

 

There were many facets to Nora's life- her love for Liam, her family, friends, GAA and life in general.

Nora and Liam got married in Knockanure Church only 14 years ago Nora was proud of her roots and during her wedding speech she said ‘Kelly was a shorter version of Kennelly'.

She was a loving caring wife, and a soul mate to Liam. Their quality time was spent travelling both in Ireland and abroad; some of the countries they visited were Croatia, Medugorje France, and Monacco. Nora and Liam visited their family in America and Canada also.

Nora and Liam gave a summer holiday to two Chernobyl children; she introduced them to the community in Nenagh and her family in Knockanure and gave them an opportunity to see the beauty of Ireland.

 

Nora was and will continue to be an inspiration to us all. Her legacy and memory will remain in the heart of Liam and her family whose lives she touched in an unforgettable way Nora loved reminiscing of times past with her family and always dwelled on the positive side of life, she lived for the day. It is this, which will keep her memory fresh long after her death. Nora took 6 weeks leave of absence to return home to care for her father who needed constant care before he passed away on February 17th last. Nora had a special bond with her father been the youngest and she treasured the opportunity of caring for him. Nora was versatile like her father, who was attending night classes and carving marvellous pieces of bog oak up to his 89th year.

 

Nora was a great communicator and a good listener. Her wonderful warmth was evident to all who met her. Nora was a beautiful lady with a smile so radiant in love to each of us.

She was one of the most down to earth fun loving and genuine people one could hope to meet. Nora had a great interest and respect for people. She was approachable, hospitable, and loyal and had a kindly word for all. She had a natural ability to get on with all age groups, she took delight in being with people, she loved the ‘bit of crack' and when she was in a group the crack was mighty' Her contribution to any gathering was significant. Her humour and warm personality won her many friends who will miss her greatly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nora's personality has revealed itself through her passion for sport. She spent many happy hours watching and attending Gaelic games. She was ardent supporter of her favourite team the Kingdom. Nora proudly wore the Jersey and the Cap; the Flag was proudly displayed in her car. Nora had a great love for musicals, drama, dancing, walks in the countryside and mountain climbing in her travels both in Ireland and abroad.

 

Her profound love and appreciation of life in all its forms was evident, by her love of flowers, trees, and shrubs. In May of last year she was up at 04.30 and joined a local group to hear the dawn chorus. Nora lived her life to the full.

 

She was deeply religious and was an active member of the parish in Puckane community.
Nora had the special gift of reflection and prayer, - each morning she prayed for every member of her family and Liam's family and for special members of the community who were sick.

 

Nora you will forever sit on our shoulder and guide us in our daily lives. You will remain in our hearts, we will always miss you, and we have so much to be proud and thankful for. May God hold you and love you until we all meet again. Fill the lonesome spots in our hearts with your love, as you did so many times while you were here on earth.

 

Nora is survived by her husband Liam, her sisters, Mary Rose, Rita, Eileen and Joan, brothers Jer, John, Mort, Pat, Tom and Stan, aunts Peg, Noreen Joan and Mary in England, sister in- laws and brother in -laws, her nephews, nieces, father and mother in law, Liam and Ann.

 

Requiem Mass for Nora Kelly was celebrated at Puckane Church, Nenagh on Friday April 29th by Fr Slattery PP Puckane among the con celebrants were Fr Lucid PP Moyvane, Fr Tommy O Hanlon cousin, Fr Walsh, Cannon Horgan, Fr Burke, Fr Whelan and Fr Cullen. Mourners came from all parts of Ireland and abroad to pay their last respects.

A guard of honour was provided by her work colleagues from the civil service and the GAA.

The local choir sang the hymns, the community provided refreshments for the large numbers who attended the removal. The funeral cortege took the coast Road and Nora was laid to rest in Knockanure, Old Churchyard. If only Nora could see the beautiful ever-changing views on that day.

 

May God have mercy on her gentle soul.

 

Local events: Parnell visited Kilmorna on Sunday January 18th 1891 he was born in 1846. Sr. Mary Berchmans Kennelly of Knockanure entered the convent on 20th January 1906 she died in Brentford in 1959; J. J. McNamara B. Agric. Science gave a talk to Knockanure Macra on 21st January 1956 on his visit to Denmark in 1954 at the time 60% of total agricultural production was consumed by the Danes, 27% of the population got their livelihood from agriculture, 90% of agricultural exports went to England.

 

 

 

Jan 5 -06 Notes

SCHOOLS: Because of the shortage of teaching posts several teachers set up their own Secondary Schools in the 1930's and ‘40's. Catholics Secondary Schools were set up in Abbeyfeale, Tarbert, Glin, Newcastlewest and Castleisland to name a few, the annual fee for a student was £9 to £12 per year. The Principal of Colaiste Mhuire which was established in 1937 in Abbeyfeale was Miss Catherine Woulfe, who studied under Dr. Douglas Hyde. This year it is 40 years since O Malley's free education bill.

 

 

CONGRATULATIONS to Mary Collins who celebrated her 100th birthday on January 18th 06 Mary was the second of six children born to John and Elizabeth Collins of Direen, Athea. Mary did her teacher training in Scotland where she taught for some years, returning home to teach in Kilbaha, Clash and Athea. Mary's centenary party was held at Dromore Nursing Home and was attended by Cannon Kelly of Athea and her nephews, nieces, friends and relations

 

Kerryman of 1940; Death took place of Mother Genevieve Sheahan aged 77 years and 56 years in religion she was a sister of the late Fr Peter Sheahan of Newtownsandes and Fr Denis Sheahan of Manchester Diocese, death also of Mrs William Cahill of Knocknisnaw;


Feb. 10th 1906 Kerryman
Mr M J Nolan Vice-Chairman of Kerry County Council fired on near his house in Newtownsandes;

Feb 1906
Funeral of Fr John Foran PP, Prior at Listowel, he was predeceased by his brother Fr William who died in Australia, survived by brothers and sisters, principal celebrant of Mass was Rev Coleman Sweeney nephew, Fr Foran was buried in the family grave at Murhur.
Marriage of Michael Buckley son of the late Mr T Buckley of Knockane and Mary Bridget Nolan daughter of Mr M.J. Nolan of Moyvane House, her uncle Mr M.J. Moore attended;

 

Kennelly

We found my grandfather's baptismal records at the church in Moyvane. He was born in the Ahalahana townland. His parents are Martin Kennelly and Hanora Callaghan. Their children (and their baptismal dates) are as follows:
Mary B., Oct. 2, 1894
Michael, January 26, 1896
Margaret, June 4, 1898
Joanna, May 18, 1901
Rosanna, July 14, 1903
George (our grandfather), Jan. 24, 1907

 

 




Hi to all on the list. I have just not long joined and I would like to post
a message in hopes that someone can help me. I have a letter which was
dated 11 April 1892 CLONLEHARD The context was that grandfather ( Patrick
KIELY) died the 21st. August 1891 and his funeral went to KNOCKANURE he had
a hearse to take him there and a fine oak coffin etc, etc, I don't know
where this Cemetery is in relation to Knockanure or what. I managed to get a
picture of the are a on the internet but I am still in the "dark" as to whre
it is. Also another area was mentioned in the letter GLENDRAUGH. Where is
this place. I have a name of the family that lived in this place JAMES
DALTON he married Margaret K KIELY who is/ was the daughter of the person
who is buried at KNOCKANURE.
If there is someone out there who may be able to help me I would be very
pleased. Thankyou for any help



> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: [KER] Re: IRL-KERRY-D Digest V01 #86
> Date: Wed, 2 May 2001 08:44:52 EDT
> From: FabMimi123@aol.com
> To: IRL-KERRY-L@rootsweb.com
>
> I am a descendant of John Hanrahan and Catherine O'Connor who lived in
> Tarbert.
> Anyone researching that family? Mimi
>
> Tara-Leigh O'Connor---what a pretty Irish name!
>
> ______________________________
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: [KER] Re: IRL-KERRY-D Digest V01 #86
> Date: Wed, 2 May 2001 10:21:19 -0700
> From: "Cathy Patterson" < cpatt@earthlink.net>
> To: IRL-KERRY-L@rootsweb.com
>
> Mimi,
> My great grandmother was Ellen HANRAHAN. She was the daughter of Denis
> Hanrahan and Mary ENGLISH. I don't know her siblings names. They were from
> Ballybunion.
> Cathy
> -----Original Message-----
> From: FabMimi123@aol.com < FabMimi123@aol.com>
> To: IRL-KERRY-L@rootsweb.com < IRL-KERRY-L@rootsweb.com>
> Date: Wednesday, May 02, 2001 5:45 AM
> Subject: [KER] Re: IRL-KERRY-D Digest V01 #86
>
> I am a descendant of John Hanrahan and Catherine O'Connor who lived in
> Tarbert.
> Anyone researching that family? Mimi
>
> Tara-Leigh O'Connor---what a pretty Irish name!
>
> ==== IRL-KERRY Mailing List ====
> SHARE YOUR STUFF! Our Kerry homepage needs your help!
> Do you have data/info that might help other Kerry researchers?
> E-mail me! Waterlilys@aol.com
>
> ______________________________
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: [KER] Searching for O'Connor family from Knockanure, County Kerry
> Date: Wed, 2 May 2001 12:28:13 -0700
> From: "Tara-Leigh O'Connor (Livesey)" < TOConnor@accountantsplus.com>
> To: IRL-KERRY-L@rootsweb.com
>
> Hello -
>
> I am new to genealogy - I am trying to research my husband's paternal family
> line - O'Connor. I believe that they resided in a town called Knockanure in
> County Kerry. All of my information is hearsay. Any additional information
> and dates would be most helpful.
>
> Cornelius O'Connor (b. 1800 d. 1878) who married Margaret Leary (b. 1811 d.
> 1876)
>
> One of their many children was James O'Connor (d. 1924) who married a
> neighbor, Mary Hunt.
>
> They had 13 children
>
> Dr. John O'Connor (b. 1863 d. 1948 in San Francisco) immigrated to San
> Francisco - One of the founders of St. Francis Hospital in San Francisco.
> Don't know who he married - but had 3 children Dr. John Jay O'Connor, Dr.
> Vincent O'Connor and Dr. Gerald O'Connor
> Michael O'Connor (b. 1864) immigrated to Alaska - became a mayor of a town
> in Alaska. Don't know who he married but had one adopted child - Pauline
> O'Connor.
> Cornelius O'Connor (b. 1866 d. in Tralee)
> Dr. James Hunt O'Connor (b. 1/3/1869 d. 2/2/1948 in San Francisco)
> immigrated to San Francisco - One of the founders of St. Francis Hospital
> in San Francisco. Married Nellie Fallon and had 3 children - James Francis
> O'Connor, Pauline O'Connor and Florence O'Connor
> Margaret (Maggie) O'Connor (d. 1932) - Sisters of Mercy, General Hospital
> Honora (Nora) O'Connor (b. 1871). Married a man with the last name of Carr.
> Marion O'Connor (b. 6/21/1876). Married John Godfrey. They had 5 children
> - John Godfrey, James Godfrey, Cornelius Godfrey, Edward Godfrey and Thomas
> Godfrey.
> Annie O'Connor (b. 1878 d. in Dublin, Ireland) Sisters of Mercy, St.
> Michaels Hospital, Dublin, Ireland
> Dr. Thomas O'Connor (b. 1881 d. in San Francisco) immigrated to San
> Francisco - One of the founders of St. Francis Hospital in San Francisco.
> Married a woman named Alice.. Had 2 children - Aileen O'Connor and Desmond
> O'Connor.
> Bridie O'Connor (b. 2/2/1884 d. in Dublin, Ireland) Sisters of Mercy, Matter
> Hospital
> Jeremiah O'Connor (b. 1886 d. 1921 in Knockanure, County Kerry). He married
> Ellen Keane. They had 5 children - Mary O'Connor, James O'Connor, John
> O'Connor (Listowel - owner of O'Connor Pharmacy), Michael O'Connor and
> Josephine O'Connor.
> Elizabeth O'Connor ( 7/2/1887). She married James Godfrey. They had 7
> children - Father Edward Godfrey, James Godfrey (Dublin), Thomas Godfrey,
> Larry Godfrey, Nancy Godfrey, Jerome Godfrey and Mary Godfrey.
> Nellie O'Connor (b. 1889)
>
> Tara-Leigh O'Connor



is www.donaldmiller.com Health site

 

 

Between 1847 and 1852 Over 1,200,000 of the Irish people emigrated to other lands. More than 1,ooo,ooo of these went to the United States of America, Between 1851 and 1905 4,028,589 emigrants left Ireland- 2,092,154 males and 1,936,435 females .1852 the highest total, 190,322 people, and 1905 the lowest, 30,676 .Since 1892. 1841 the rural population was, returned as 7,052,923 and the urban as 1,143,674, 1901 rural 3,073,846 and town 1,384,929
1901, the population had diminished as compared with 1891 by 245,975. Of the total population of 4,458,775, 2,200,040 were males and 2,258,735 were females. The inhabitants of the rural districts (3,073,846) decreased during the decade by over 380,000; that of the urban districts (1,384,929) increased by over 140,000. Between 1891 and 1901 Belfast increased from 273,079 to 349,180; Dublin from 268,587 to 289,108; and Londonderry from 33,200 to 39,873. Cork (75,978), Waterford (26,743) remained the same over 10 years.
Thanks so much for your reply to my inquiry regarding the O'Connell's from
Newtownsandes. I do not know of any relationship to the priest you mentioned,
but I do not know much about my O'Connell either. The sum and substance of
everything I know is as follows:
My great grandfather Maurice O'Connell was born @1866. He immigrated to the
US in @ 1886 and settled in New Jersey (across the river from New York). His
brother John, born @1868, followed @ 1889-1890 and settled in the same
area-- known as the Oranges ( suburbs of Newark NJ) Maurice married Anna
O'Brien in 1889. Anna was also an Irish immigrant and is believed to be from
the same area as Maurice. Anna's mother's maiden name was Ann Kirby. My great
grandfather's marriage and death certificates both list his parents as John
and Catherine O'Connell.
My mom never had any idea where her grandfather was from, although she did
recall her mom saying that he took in a lot of immigrants to give them a
start. I checked the census returns for New Jersey and found some of these
people he took in. They were all O'Connell's. Through the Ellis Island data
base I was able to locate the manifests for the ships on which they arrived.
Immigrants arriving after 1899 had to list where they were going, where they
were from and who they were to stay with. Each of the people with my great
grand list Newtownsandes as the place they last resided before coming to the
US and each of these people provide my great grands address as the place
they were going. here is a website (jewishgen.org) that allows a search by
the town people came from. Through that search engine I located no less than
eight people named O'Connell from Newtownsandes going to stay with my great
grand. The information I have on them is as follows:
1.James O'Connell immigrated 1903 from Newtownsand. James apparently left
and returned in 1907 with a John O'Connell both from Newtownsandes and both
Identifying my great grand as a cousin. (James stayed with my great
grandmother throughout his life. His obituary indicates his mother's name is
Catherine Doherty)
2.Two Lawrence O'Connell, both from Newtownsandes, immigrated a week apart in
1904. Both of them were age 25 and both said they were going to stay with
"their brother James" at my great grand's address ( so was my great grand
running an illegal immigration operation?)
3. 1906-A John O'Connell (age 27) from Newtownsandes arrives to stay with my
great grand. Refers to my great grand as his "brother" (not possible since
Maurice's brother John was already here)
4.1907-Another James O'Connell(age 25) arrives a week before the returning
James (actually I am not sure which is the original James and which is the
returning James) Again says going to his cousin (my great grand). Says he
last resided in Newtownsandes and was born in Ballymacelligot
5. 1911- Lawrence O'Connell (age 34)returns (yet again) again going to his
brother James at my great grand address. Says he last resided with his sister
Catherine in Newtownsandes
6.1913 (this is the strangest one of all) A Daniel (age 33) and Mary
O'Connell (age 36) arrive. He had never been in US before. She had been here
previously. They are listed as husband and wife. Daniel says he last resided
with his father John O'Connell in Ahalana, Newtownsandes. Mary says she last
resided with her brother James O'Connell in Ahalana. Both are going to my
great grand's brother John. Mary refers to John as "her brother John" ;
Daniel refers to John as "my cousin John" (were they also intermarrying?)
Finally in 1914 Daniel returns again having his nearest living relative as
his father John in Newtownsandes. He is returning to the US to his wife Mary
who is by that time living with my great grand Maurice.
Do any of these people show up in your research? Do you have any suggestions?
for me as to any local sources to tap into to solve these relationships?
I had inquired in my last e-mail as to the names of the town lands that would
be considered part of Newtownsandes. The reason for that inquiry was to allow
a more thorough search of the website mentioned above. There are no less than
4000 O'Connell's in the Ellis Island Data Base. I found the ones mentioned
above by searching the word Newtownsandes and variations thereon. I thought
if there were other names that folks might use to describe the area I could
search using those descriptions as well.
Any help is appreciated.
Francine Schott


GRIFFITS Murhur List

http://www.failteromhat.com/griffiths/kerry/murher.htm







TOM MOORE

 

Newtownsandes Famous People:
Thomas Moore his ancestors are said to have come from Newtownsandes.Tom Moore Poet born Dublin 28 of May 1779.He died 26th of Feb 1852 in his 73rd Year bured at Bromham near Devizes in Wiltshire England his Father was a Grocer till 1806 he later became a barrick master.It is thought his Mother had a great Influence on Him.After the Relief act of 1793 Catholics were allowed to enter TCD but were denied Degres.Mr Whyte Teacher of Tom Moore Entered him in TCD at the age of 15 as a Protestant.He left TCD in 1798 to Study Law in London.He Never Practiced Law writing was his Passion so in 1801 he Published his first Poems under the pen name of Thomas Little.Thomas Moore was Welcomed Everywhere he could Sing his own songs and Entertain in any Society.In 1803 he was Appointed as Registrar of the Admiralty Court at Bermuda.He stayed at his Post for a short while.Then put his Deputy in Charge while himself toured the U.S.A and Canada.More Poems were Published in 1806.Irish Melodies were Published in 1807.200 years Later his Irish Songs are still Popular all over the world.Actress Bessy Dyke Married Tom Moore in 1811.''Lalla Rookh'' was Published in 1817.Longmans Paid the Highest Price Ever for the Copy Right.About this time his Deputy in Bermuda Caused a huge loss and Moore was Liable to avoid Arrest he went to Paris and his Family Followed Him there.C 1822 he made a Bargain where the Claim Against him was Reduced to one sixth of the Original Claim which he paid he was now free to come home iifig .....
In 1823 he visited Ireland with Lord Lansdowne after which he wrote a history of Captain Rock and His Ancestors which was well Recived.He was a friend of Emmet and Remembers him in ''O Breathe Not his name''.Other Historical works of Tom Moore, Life of Sheridan Published in 1825 it took 7 years to write, Life of Byron Pub 1830. Life of Lord Edward Fitzgerald Pub 1831.Travels of an Irish Gentleman in Seach of a Religion.Published 1834 also the History of Ireland was Published Later.
In 1845 all his Children and Sisters were Dead he said that he did not have a single Relative left in the world.

Thomas Moore


Fr William Moloney lately arrived from Ireland took up a tempory position in Sierra Valley where lived about 1000 people many of them Ranchers in 1868 . He is noted as being the first Missionary to visit the north of Pumas County . Visiting Johnsville on Deer Creek , Quincy, Indian Valley, Susanville and Honey Lake Valley in Lassen County . He was the first Priest in Lassen County . The records show that Fr William Moloney was very active on the Missions in California and Nevada .He gave 40yrs service to the Church in this area . Journies of 50 miles were common . At times he would be 100 miles from the end of the trail at Downieville where mining took place in 1880 . He named his famous Horse Charley . In the mountain area of Northern California travel in winter was difficult with deep snow drifts . To travel you would need a pine board 4" wide and 8 to 12ft long fixed to the soles of shoes a long stick was needed for balance . A priest had to be strong and fit to cope with the hardships of Missionary life . It took 6 weeks to make the circuit from Truckee to Alturas and back home again . Fr William Moloney son of Tadhg and Kate Enright born Coilagurteen, Knockanure in 1841 Ordained 1864, died Sutter Creek 1903 . He was a brother of M T Moloney Solicitor General Ottawa .Inscriptions on Family Headstone Gale Cemetery , Timothy Moloney died Nov 1st 1885 aged 93yrs . Memorial Erected by their son Maurice Moloney Ottawa Ill. USA . Also remembered son John Moloney who died Jan 19th 1904 .his wife Ellen died 13th April 1908 .son Edward Moloney died Nov 5th 1872 aged 27yrs.

Tom Neville Stack
Information from Miss Mai Quillinan .
Tom Stack was married in Carrueragh Kilmorna , to Mary Neville of Carrigkerry . They had three sons the eldest born on christmas night 1849 was called Thomas Neville Stack . The second son Maurice Tom Stack married Mary Goulding their children were Tom Maurice and John Maurice Tom inherited the farm while John went to America . The third brother of Tom Neville Stack was called William he got a farm in Carrigkerry .
Mai Quillinans mother Ellie Stack was daughter of Maurice Tom Stack a brother of Tom Neville .
Mais father Michael Quillinan of Blossom Hill Rathkeale , Co Limerick . Tom Neville Stack Founded The Finance Union Journal in 1877 .It is reported that three generations before Tom Neville a member of the Stack family was a Butter Merchant in Cork who had a brother a Banker .
Another Stack Nicholas Moore Stack a man of culture and an actor taught at Maynooth and Carlow College .
Tom Neville himself was a Journalist a Financier and a Poet his second wife was a daughter of Mr Andrew Thunder of Dublin .
Mr Thunder went to Clongroves Wood College . He died aged 45yrs .
Mr and Mrs Stack were married for over 20yrs and had five children.
In 1895 Tom Neville Stack was one of the Founders of the British Homes Assurance Corporation Ltd. .
He was also an Officer in the 2nd London Rifles which was founded by Prince Albert .
Tom Neville Stacks views on Irish Banking are contained in the Blue Book which was issued by a committee of the House of Commons

Knockanure Branch of the Land League

A meeting of the Branch was held on Sunday 1885. Mr T. W. Leahy in the chair. Other officers were Mr Patrick Kennelly, Mr J. T. Nolan honouree secretary, Mr. James o Connor, Mr. Hugh Goulding, Mr. John Carroll. Mr. M. o Connor, Mr. Dan F. Leahy, Mr. W. T. Leahy, Mr. James o Sullivan, Mr. Dunne.Honouree secretary of Athea Branch also Present.Reports of previous meetings were also read. A large number handed in their subscriptions and received cards for membership. Subsequently a large contingent headed by the Athea fife and drum band marched into the village. A large crowd had assembled outside the League room and were addressed by Mr. D. T. Leahy Mr. J O Sullivan and Mr P Dunne who spoke forcibly on the necessity of the organising the friendly feeling between Farmers and labourers vote of thanks to the Athea Contingent brought the Proceedings to a close. The Release of Knockanure Land League Prisoners in 1885 who arrived in Listowel by train from Tralee was greeted with deafening cheers. Mr. James o Sullivhan of Kilmorna presented of behalf of the noble young ladies of the parish a bouquet of flowers to Daniel Leahy and his colleagues who were just realised from prison. A crowd headed by the Listowel Brass Band marched through to Mr. Stacks new house. A meeting chaired by John Fitzpatrick of St. Michaels Collage was held. Others attending were J. Condon, solicitor Newcastlewest. J. Moran, solicitor, Listowel.
J. Stack M.P for North Kerry addressed the Meeting. A vote of thanks having been passed the people dispersed. The released prisoners were entertained to dinner at the residence of Mr. John Stack

SEEKING PERSON'S INFORMATION Name: Johanna Cleary Relation to missing: Mother Gender: Female Residence: Date of advertisement:01-22-1859 Contact name: Holland,Mrs. Contact address: OH, Cincinnati,6thst

 

Festival Time

 

 

 

This coming weekend sees the second staging of Athea Parish Festival which is organised by the Con Colbert Community Hall Committee. From Thursday afternoon to Sunday night there will be something for people of all ages  to enjoy from the tea party to card games, darts, barman’s race, slow bike race, fancy dress, 5K road race, Ceili, Comhaltas Concert, Festival Queen, dances and barbeques. Hope I haven’t left anything out of this very full and exciting programme of events. All we need now is a bit of fine weather. I can’t help thinking back to the old carnivals in Athea in the middle of the last century. They were organised by the G.A.A. and the village would be packed for the duration. We had a dozen pubs in those days and each one would be full as people came, not only from our own parish but from neighbouring parishes as well, to join in the festivities. There was a lot more drinking in those days than there is now.  We hear a lot about binge drinking, especially by the younger generation, but they wouldn’t hold a candle to the drinkers of old. Young people generally confine their drinking to the weekends and then maybe on one night only but, back in the ‘seventies, the bars were doing a brisk trade day and night. Some people couldn’t even go to the creamery in the morning without having a pint or two. Thankfully there were very few motor vehicles on the road so accidents were scarce. Anyway a good time would be had by all at the carnival.

 

 

 

In those days regulations were not as strict as they are today. A marquee would be erected for dancing, which was the main source of income over the week. Bands would be booked from all over the country and the place would be heaving with bodies. The problem of toilets was solved by letting the men use the bushes out the back but the ladies presented a problem. On the first occasion of using a marquee the problem was solved by a local business man who cordoned off one area outside and placed an empty paint bucket in it for the ladies to use! Needless to say they weren’t amused. As time went on things improved and, though they wouldn’t have a hope of passing inspection today, proper toilets were supplied. At that time there were no direct telephone lines. If you wanted to make a call you had to turn a handle to get through to the local exchange who patched you through to Listowel if you were going outside the area. Making a call home from England was a similar task. During one carnival my aunt Nora, who lived in Coventry was trying to call my mother (we had one of the few phones in the parish  – very posh!) about 8pm in the evening. She went through the local exchange to the international one which got her as far as Dublin and then onto Listowel and finally to Athea.  The operator asked to be connected to Athea 17 which was our number at the time. The late Edsie O’Connor R.I.P. was manning the switchboard and answered; “there is no point in looking for them, they are at the carnival, I saw them a couple of minutes ago”.  That was service for you.

 

 

 

One of the highlights of the carnival was the donkey derby. There was great rivalry between local donkey owners and there was often a “ringer” slipped in. On one occasion a donkey qualified for the final but when he appeared at the starting line he was a lot bigger than  when he qualified half an hour before. Of course a row ensued but eventually peace was restored and the race was finally run when the big donkey was disqualified. Happy days. No problem with insurance in those days. If you wanted to run a donkey derby in the street now it would be nearly impossible to get insurance cover for it. Despite the absence of donkeys, enjoy the forthcoming festival.

 

 

 

 Domhnall de Barra

 




MISSING PERSON'S INFORMATION
Name: Thomas Walsh
Gender: Male
Age:
Earlier name used:
Alias:
Description:
Other:

POINT OF ORIGIN INFORMATION
Home County: Kerry
Parish: Knockanure
Townland: Coheredarigan,Kilmeany
Barony: Iraghticonnor
Poor-Law: Listowel

WORK HISTORY
Ireland occupation:
US occupation:
Company name:
Work location:
Labor union member:

LOCATION AFTER ARRIVAL
1st location: Ia,Dubuque
2nd location:
3rd location:
My Own Newcastlewest

By Garry McMahon

 

To a town in County Limerick where the river Arra flows,

My heart takes flight, each day and night, at work or in repose,

Cross sundering seas, fond memories of the place that I love best,

To roam again each hill and glen, round my own Newcastlewest.

 

From Barnagh Gap, spread like a map, I see Limerick, cork and Clare,

The Ashford Hills and Phelan's Mills, the verdant Golden Vale,

I hear the sound of the beagle hound, put fox and hare to test,

And in reverie I can clearly see my own Newcastle West.

 

And often in the evening when the summer sun went down,

With rod and reel I fished the Deel, a mile outside the town,

Through salty tears and lonely years, my heart ached in my breast,

As I laid my head on a foreign bed, far from Newcastle West.

 

Once more the clash of hurley ash re-echoes in my ears,

As I recall my comrades all, when I now roll back the years,

On the playing field we ne'er would yield and we always gave of our best,

To bring honour bright to the black and white of our own Newcastle West.

 

Through Nash's Land to the old Demesne, where my love she gave sigh,

In the grove of oak her voice it broke, as we kissed our last goodbye,

A stor mo chroi no more I'll see, you're going just like the rest,

And you never will return again to your own Newcastle West.

 

So I'll say slan to fair Knockane, Gortboy likewise I'll greet,

To Boherbee and sweet South Quay, Churchtown and Maiden Street,

But God is good and I' am sure he would grant an exile's last request,

And let me die ‘neath a limerick sky in my own Newcastle West.

 

 





World's top maths genius jobless and living with mother
By Nadejda Lobastova in St Petersburg and Michael Hirst


(Filed: 20/08/2006)

 

A maths genius who won fame last week for apparently spurning a million-dollar prize is living with his mother in a humble flat in St Petersburg, co-existing on her £30-a-month pension, because he has been unemployed since December.


Grigory 'Grisha' Perelman


The Sunday Telegraph tracked down the eccentric recluse who stunned the maths world when he solved a century-old puzzle known as the Poincaré Conjecture.

Grigory "Grisha" Perelman's predicament stems from an acrimonious split with a leading Russian mathematical institute, the Steklov, in 2003. When the Institute in St Petersburg failed to re-elect him as a member, Dr Perelman, 40, was left feeling an "absolutely ungifted and untalented person", said a friend. He had a crisis of confidence and cut himself off.

Other friends say he cannot afford to travel to this week's International Mathematical Union's congress in Madrid, where his peers want him to receive the maths equivalent of the Nobel Prize, and that he is too modest to ask anyone to underwrite his trip.

Interviewed in St Petersburg last week, Dr Perelman insisted that he was unworthy of all the attention, and was uninterested in his windfall. "I do not think anything that I say can be of the slightest public interest," he said. "I am not saying that because I value my privacy, or that I am doing anything I want to hide. There are no top-secret projects going on here. I just believe the public has no interest in me."

He continued: "I know that self-promotion happens a lot and if people want to do that, good luck to them, but I do not regard it as a positive thing. I realised this a long time ago and nobody is going to change my mind. "Newspapers should be more discerning over who they write about. They should have more taste. As far as I am concerned, I can't offer anything for their readers.

"I don't base that on any negative experiences with the press, although they have been making up nonsense about my father being a famous physicist. It's just plain and simply that I don't care what anybody writes about me at all."

Dr Perelman has some small savings from his time as a lecturer, but is apparently reluctant to supplement them with the $1 million (£531,000) offered by the Clay Mathematics Institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts, for solving one of the world's seven "Millennium Problems".


Grigory as a student


The Poincaré Conjecture was first posed by the French mathematician, Jules Henri Poincaré, in 1904, and seeks to understand the shape of the universe by linking shapes, spaces and surfaces.

Friends say that evidence of Dr Perelman's innate modesty came when - having finally solved the problem after more than 10 years' work - he simply posted his conclusion on the internet, rather than publishing his explanation in a recognised journal. "If anybody is interested in my way of solving the problem, it's all there - let them go and read about it," said Dr Perelman. "I have published all my calculations. This is what I can offer the public."

Friends were not surprised to learn that he was living with his mother. The Jewish family - he has a younger sister, Elena, also a mathematician - was always close. One friend, Sergey Rukshin, head of St Petersburg Mathematical Centre for Gifted Students, gave Dr Perelman his first break as a teenager.

At 16, he won a gold medal at the 1982 International Mathematical Olympiad, with a perfect score of 42. He was also a talented violinist and played table tennis. It was after gaining his PhD from St Petersburg State University that Dr Perelman first worked at the Steklov Institute, part of the Russian Academy of Science. Later, he worked in America before returning to the Steklov in 1996. Its rejection of him, three years ago, devastated Dr Perelman, said Mr Rukshin.

Although the two old friends still discuss life, music and literature, they no longer talk about maths. "It has become a painful topic for the doctor," said Mr Rukshin

 

 

 

I was unable to make connections to the modern Moyvane. although I am sure there are some there. I am mostly interested in finding the gravesites of my relatives, particularly Michale & Johanna Goulding for a start. I know that there must be relatives who are not named Goulding. The names Kennelly, Stack, O'Connor, Woulfe for starter, pop up in the family tree.

Margaret Moran (Dalton) had 2 sisters, Hannah Moran (white) and and a sister who lived in New Haven Connecticut , not sure what her first name was, he married last name was Ahern, Mrs. John Ahern. Margaret Moran (Dalton) also had 2 brothers, James P. Moran of Chicago and Tim Moran of Kansas City. Margaret lived to be 79 years old and dies Oct. 27th 1957.

Margaret Moran (Dalton) married Patrick Joseph Dalton and had 3 sons, Patrick Joseph Dalton (Jr) my father of Kansas City MO, Con or Cornelius Dalton of North ridge California and James Dalton of Mission Kansas. She also had a Daughter who dies about the age of 21, her name I think was also Margaret.

I do not have any information on the Hanrahan side of the family other then what I provided but I would welcome anything you might know.

Diocese of KERRY , Parish of MOYVANE R.C.
Marriage of PATRICK MORAN of KEALOD and MARY HANRAHAN of KILBAHA on 2 February 1873


Husband Name PATRICK MORAN of KEALOD son of MICHAEL MORAN
MARY HANRAHAN Address KILBAHA Father PATRICK HANRAHAN Mother


Name MICHAEL MORAN Date of Birth 6 November 1873 Address KEALOD Father PATRICK MORAN Mother MARY HANRAHAN


Name CATHERINE MORAN Date of Birth 26 December 1881 Address NR Father PATRICK MORAN Mother MARY HANRAHAN


Name MARY MORAN Date of Birth 2 July 1889 Address KEALID Father PATRICK MORAN Mother MARY HANRAHAN

Name CORNELIUS MORAN Date of Birth 1 February 1884 Address KEALID Father PATRICK MORAN Mother MARY HANRAHAN







Cousin of Yours:Name WILLIAM FORHAN Date of Birth 10 February 1859 (Based on other date information) Address MURHUR Father PATRICK FORHAN Mother CATHERINE MORAN


Name JAMES MORAN Date of Birth 29 July 1855 (Based on other date information) Address KEALID Father MICHAEL MORAN Mother JOHANNA BROSNAHAN


HusbandWifeName MICHAEL MORAN SARAH CONNOR Address NR BEENNANASPIG Occupation NR NR Father NR MORAN NR NR Mother NR NR NR NR 1st Nov. 1851.



May be the first or second Moran Family in Kealod: Name CATHERINE MORAN Date of Birth 13 March 1834 (Based on other date information) Address KEALID Father MICHAEL MORAN Mother JOHANNA BROSNAHAN


Name MICHAEL MORAN Date of Birth 30 September 1852 (Based on other date information) Address KEALID Father MICHAEL MORAN Mother NR BROSNAHAN


Name STEPHEN MORAN Date of Birth 25 December 1859 (Based on other date information) Address KEALID Father MICHAEL MORAN Mother JOHANNA BROSNAHAN


Name JOHN MORAN Date of Birth 19 February 1865 (Based on other date information) Address KEOLID Father JOHN MORAN Mother MARGARET SHEEHY

Name JOHANNA MORAN Date of Birth 16 December 1874 Address KEOLID Father PATRICK MORAN Mother MARY HANRAHAN


Name PATRICK MORAN Date of Birth 16 February 1880 Address KEALID Father PATRICK MORAN Mother HONORA HANRAHAN Patrick married Bridget Kennelly about 30 yrs later.

Name JAMES MORAN Date of Birth 14 July 1888 Address KEALID Father PATRICK MORAN Mother MARY HANRAHAN


Name STEPHEN MORAN Date of Birth 18 August 1890 Address KEALID Father PATRICK MORAN Mother MARY HANRAHAN


Name EDMUND MORAN Date of Birth 20 May 1895 Address NR Father PATRICK MORAN Mother MARY HANRAHAN

Name MARGARET MORAN Date of Birth 11 October 1876 Address KEOLID Father PATRICK MORAN Mother MARY HANRAHAN

Name LAURENCE MORAN Date of Birth 18 November 1883 Address KEALID Father PATRICK MORAN Mother MARY HANRAHAN





Name PATRICK QUIN
Date of Birth 20 November 1835 (Based on other date information)
Address CHAPELCROSS
Father MATHEW QUIN
Mother MARGARET KANE

Further details in the record
Child Denomination RC
Father Occupation NR
Sponsor 1 DENIS MORAN
Sponsor 1 Address NR
Sponsor 2 HONORA BARRETT
Sponsor 2 Address NR



Older Generation: Name ELLEN MORAN Date of Birth 25 December 1831 (Based on other date information) Address KILBAHA Father JOHN MORAN Mother MARY HANRIHAN

 

 

 

 

Taken from the Independant

Saturday December 22 2007

This week's purchase of the 49pc of housebuilder Manor Park Homes which he didn't already own shows that, at 72 years of age, Joe Moran has lost none of his appetite for the deal. Almost 40 years after the former creamery manager first came to Dublin he remains one of the great "characters" of Irish business.

Ever since Jim Flavin put DCC's 49pc stake in Manor Park Homes up for sale in February the question everyone has been asking is, who would get the better of the deal, Flavin or Moran, who owned the other 51pc of the company?

This week we got our answer. Not alone did Flavin get his timing all wrong, choosing to exit Manor Park Homes just after the construction boom had peaked, he was also up against one of the wiliest negotiators in Irish business. Early predictions that DCC would get close to €350m for its stake proved to be completely wide of the mark.

Of course, DCC's hand was seriously weakened by the fact that, with a 51pc shareholding, Moran was always in a dominant position. His hand was further strengthened by the fact that the downturn in the housing market deterred most other bidders. Moran exploited this advantage ruthlessly, eventually paying €181m, just over half the price DCC had originally been hoping for.

The deal capped a miserable year for Flavin, who is fighting to hang on to his job following last July's decision by the Supreme Court that he had possessed insider information when he sold DCC's shareholding in fruit distributor Fyffes in February 2000.

Successfully outwitting Flavin, one of the sharpest operators in Irish business, demonstrates yet again that Moran is nobody's fool. Behind the well-practiced "sure I'm just a simple Kerryman" schtick lies a first-class business brain that has kept him at the forefront of Ireland's entrepreneurial elite for over a generation.

Moran was born in the east Kerry village of Brosna, the son of the local creamery manager and his national school teacher wife. He was educated at Rockwell College in Co Tipperary before going on to study dairy science at UCC. After graduating as a "cowpuncher" he followed in his father's steps and became a creamery manager.

In the Ireland of the late 1950s and early 1960s the creamery manager occupied an exalted position in rural society. Not quite up there with the local parish priest, but as one of the handful of people in the community with a university education, definitely on a par with the doctor and teacher.

Unfortunately, this lofty social position wasn't matched by a similarly elevated salary. In those days virtually every village had its own local co-op. While this meant that there were plenty of jobs as creamery managers for dairy science graduates, the rewards were meagre. Moran's father always operated a sideline business to boost his income.

Even worse, with the Irish dairy industry belatedly consolidating into larger production units through a series of mergers and acquisitions, from the early 1960s onwards, the writing was on the wall for the small local dairy co-ops. Sensing which way the wind was blowing, Moran decided to abandon the joys of creamery management and work for himself instead.

He moved to Dublin and joined his father, who had by now "retired", running a small fireplace manufacturing business, Moran's. According to Moran, when he first arrived in Dublin he knew only two places, Croke Park and his sister Mairead's flat. Even if this story is true, Moran didn't waste any time in getting to know his adopted city. So successful was Moran's that it was sold for £3.5m (€4.4m) in 1978, a huge sum in those days.

Following the success of Moran's, Joe Moran went into the building supplies business. His company, Buckley's, quickly carved out a profitable niche in the market before being bought by Heiton, now part of Grafton. In the late 1970s he also purchased up-market Dublin jeweller, West's.

However, it was two other businesses with which he first became involved with in the late 1970s that were to have a lasting impact on his future career and reputation.

He teamed up with Jim Flavin, who had founded DCC three years previously, to found Manor Park Homes. Over the next 28 years it would grow to become one of the largest housebuilders in the state. In 2003 Manor Park and Moran made the front pages when the company agreed to pay €45m to the late Taoiseach Charles Haughey for his Abbeville mansion and surrounding estate at Kinsealy.

Manor Park is now attempting to persuade the 600 members of Clontarf Golf Club to accept a €100m offer for the 77-acre acre course on Dublin's northside. As part of the deal Manor Park is offering to build the club a new course and clubhouse at Kinsealy. Complicating the deal is the fact that the club only owns 12 acres of the course at Clontarf outright, with the remainder being leased from Dublin City Council on a long-term sporting lease.

In March 2006 Moran appeared before the Mahon Tribunal to testify that he had paid disgraced lobbyist Frank Dunlop £25,000 (€31,750) in fees to lobby for the rezoning of land he owned at Lissenhall in north Co Dublin during 1992.

The other major business Moran became involved with during the late 1970s was Irish Wire. Founded in 1935 to produce nails and screws behind the De Valera-era tariff barriers, the company found the transition to free trade after Ireland joined the EU in 1973 extremely difficult.

Moran first invested in the company in 1978 and was the key figure, either as a director, chief executive or chairman, in its affairs for the following 28 years.

By 1987 it was clear that Irish Wire's Limerick-based nail manufacturing operation could no longer be salvaged. Instead the company was reincarnated as a shell company, using its stock exchange-traded shares as a currency with which to buy other companies. To help in the reconstruction of Irish Wire, now renamed IWP, Moran recruited Dennis Jones, then finance director of Hazlewood Foods.

With his taste for gold rings on every finger and bracelets on both wrists, Jones was one of the most flamboyant figures ever to sit on the board of an Irish quoted company. He was also a compulsive spender who ran up huge debts, mainly for unpaid jewellry. He was eventually forced to resign from the boards of Hazlewood and IWP when one of the UK tabloids published a series of pictures of him in the company of scantily-clad, nubile young ladies who were definitely not his nieces.

Despite, or perhaps because of these failings, Jones was a brilliant deal-maker. In the space of a few years he and Moran transformed IWP from a moribund former nail-maker into a diversified industrial holding company.

Moran enjoyed a good run at IWP. Earlier in the decade his 14pc stake in the company was worth over €16m. However, the wheels started coming off IWP in late 2002 when problems emerged at its Dutch operations. With its high debt levels the company was unable to turn the situation around and the share price went into a tailspin, from a high €1.70 in July 2002 the share price had collapsed to just 3.5 cent when the vulture funds who had bought most of IWP's debts took control of the company in 2006.

He has enjoyed better luck with IFG, the other shell company with which he became involved in the late 1980s. He has served as chairman of IFG since 1987. Now a financial services company, Moran's 5.2m shares are worth €7.7m.

However, Manor Park has long since represented the vast bulk of his wealth. On the basis of this week's deal, his 51pc stake is worth at least €188m. Given that Moran was in such a strong position the shareholding is almost certainly worth much more than that. Not bad going for the Kerry cowpuncher.

 

 

Poetry

 

Dreams

There is this place I go to

When I’m happy or sad

I can do anything I want to

It really isn’t that bad.

It can make me upset

Or I could bet

I can do anything

Or make me fret.

After all it is my world

I can be good, bad or bold

My life here can never be told

To the young and old.

By

Edwina Sheehan ,Ballyhahill.

 

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A Tribute to the late

 

Mike Enright

Athea

 

 

By Polly the Poet

 

 

 

On my favourite station

 

The one that tops the rest

 

I’m sure you know by now

 

It is in Limerick’s West

 

Every day I tune in

 

It’s where my heart belongs

 

Lots of chat and friendliness

 

And the best of lovely songs

 

 

 

I looked forward every day

 

And Sunday night I’d rush

 

To hear my friend Mike Enright

 

With his voice so warm and plush

 

“Now there” he would whisper

 

So charming, bright and jolly

 

“The next song I will play

 

Is for my friend, dear Polly”

 

 

 

He’d love to get a text from me

 

We’d have a laugh and joke

 

His loving wife dear Margaret

 

She was blessed with this kind bloke

 

He’d play whatever song I’d like

 

From Mike Denver to Joe Dolan

 

He’d always send good wishes to

 

My other friend Mike Nolan

 

 

 

One day while I sat at home

 

I am sad to say

 

I got a call to tell me

 

That poor Mike had passed away

 

My eyes filled up with tears

 

Then I sat down and cried

 

Now in my heart forever more

 

There’ll always be a void

 

 

 

On Sunday night we’d hear him

 

With his accent so unique

 

When he’d present his country show

 

‘twas nice to hear him speak

 

High above in Heaven

 

There’s a star that’s shining bright

 

Goodbye and God rest you my friend

 

Dearest Mike Enright.

 

 

GOULDING Death

 

 

 

GOULDING Mary (nee Behan) (Knockanure, Moyvane, Co. Kerry).

October 25, 1994, at her son Sean.s residence, beloved and cherished wife of the late Hugh Goulding and loving and adored mother of the late Tony and Sr. Teresa Brendan; deeply mourned by her sons Hugh. Sean and Denis, daughter Maureen (Sr. St. Hugh), sisters Mrs. Julia Enwright (London) and Sr. Sheila O.S.F., (USA), daughters-in-law Mrs. Margaret Liston, Brenda and Eileen Goulding, nieces, nephews, grandchildren, cousins, relatives and friends. RIP. Mass of the Resurrection was celebrated at Corpus Christi Church, Knockanure on Thursday , Mary Goulding was laid to rest at Ahavoher Cemetery.

 

GOULDING (Knockanure, Moyvane, Co. Kerry):

The family of the late Mrs. Mary Goulding (nee Behan) and Sister Teresa Brendan Goulding, wish to express our sincere thanks for the overwhelming support, sympathy and prayers we have received from our many relatives, neighbours, friends and colleagues during our recent sad and sudden loss of mother and sister. We thank particularly Monsignor Jeremiah F. Kenny, Rev. Michael O.Leary P.P., Fr. Neilus Enright, C.C. and Fr. Jim Leahy, Sr. Elena Goulding and Srs. Bernadette and Vernoica Sheehan, for their care and kindness. Thanks to the Presentation Sisters of Listowel Convent for the prayers they offered at the funeral home and for the consolation they gave our family. Thank you to the Gardai for their help and concern. Thank you to all those who travelled long distances, visited the funeral home, attended the evening services, Masses and funerals, sent Mass Cards, enrolments, floral tributes, letters of sympathy, telegrams and telephoned our home. Thank you to all those who visited our home, the neighbours and relatives who organised and helped in so many ways. A special word of gratitude to our relatives and fends in England, Wales, USA, Africa, Cork, Clara, Limerick, Dublin and the six occupied counties. Thanks to all those who took part in the liturgies. We will always remember and be consoled by the most dignified music and song presented by Rita Groarke Goulding and Corita Goulding. Thank you to Dr. Joseph Devine for the care shown our mother during her illness. Thank you to Nurses Margaret Curnane, Helen O.Malley and Helen McCarthy who showed such love and friendship during such stressful days. Thank you to the Sacristan and the team who prepared the graves with such thoughtfulness. Sister Teresa's grave lined with palm was so symbolic of her gentleness. Thank you to the Lyons family, undertakers and to all those who were unable to attend but prayed for us. Please accept this acknowledgement of deep appreciation for the support given to us at such a sad time. Your kindness has made our loss more bearable. The Holy Sacrifice of the Mass will be offered for your intentions.

 

 

 

Teresa ("Tess") Goulding

Moyvane, Co. Kerry) . Aug. 28, 1994, Sr. Teresa Brendan, (suddenly) at her brother Sean's residence, darling daughter of the late Hugh Goulding and beloved sister of the late Tony Goulding; deeply mourned by her heartbroken mother Mary (nee Behan), her sorrowing brothers Hugh, Sean and Denis, her devoted sister Maureen (Sr. St. Hugh); deeply regretted by her sisters-in-law Mrs Margaret Liston. Eileen and Brenda, her aunt Sr. Sheila O.S.F. (USA) and Julia Enright (London), her nephews, nieces, cousins, relatives and friends. R.I.P. Following Requiem Mass in Knockanure Church Sr. Teresa Goulding was laid to rest at Ahavoher Graveyard, Knockanure

 

Michael Goulding

Death of Knockanure Volunteer

MR. MICHAEL GOULDING, Knockanure, who died at an advanced age, was a member of the 6th Batt. Kerry No. 1 Brigade Old I.R.A. He joined the Volunteers in 1916 and took an active part in all local activities, which included the take over of Listowel Lawn.

 

He took the Republican side during the Civil War and was arrested in 1922. He was interned in Tralee where he spent two weeks on hunger strike while awaiting transfer to Limerick Jail. While in Limerick Jail he was actively involved in the making of a tunnel through which a number of volunteers successfully made their escape.

 

He was then transported in a cargo ship from Limerick docks to Dublin and subsequently interned in the Curragh where he became closely associated with the late Sean Lemass. He was interned there for a year and a half and was unconditionally released after spending 30 days on hunger strike, with a number of other prisoners.

 

A huge crowd, which included a number of his comrades in the Fight for Freedom, attended the removal of the remains from the house to Knockanure Church, and burial in the family plot at Knockanure. The coffin was draped with the Tricolour.

Mr. Goulding is survived by his daughters: Mrs. Neil Clancy, New St., Abbeyfeale; Sister Elena. U.S.A., Patricia Danaher, Knocknaboula, Foymes. by his sons. Messrs. Joseph (U.S.A.) Michael, Newcastlewest and Christy who manages the home farm at Knockanure, his brothers, Hugh, in Knockanure and Denis, who resides In Chicago. U.S.A. and his sisters, Mrs. Nora Dore, Templeglantine, Mrs. Nell Ryan, Limerick, and Miss Hannah Goulding, Templeglantine.

 

 

 

Goulding

http://www.goulding.net/goulding.net/Listowel_and_Its_Vicinity.html

Denis Goulding was born February 4, 1893, in Knockanure, County Kerry,

Ireland, Went to America about two years after his release,

on October 26, 1926, with a girl who is now my wife of al-

most forty years. We sailed on the steamship Franconia, and

nine days later we landed in New York.

When we arrived my future wife went to see some

friends in St. Louis. She wrote back saying her friends

thought they could find a better job for me there. So I quit my

job in Kansas City and headed for St. Louis in 1927. But the

job didn't materialize, and I spent anxious weeks walking and

walking,

Finally, through acquaintances I found work in University

City, a nice clean little suburb of St. Louis in St. Louis

County. I belonged to a street repair gang. My wife, Kitty,

and I were married about this time - April, 1928.

 

On the national scene, Herbert Hoover beat Al Smith for

the presidency, and the Ford Motor Company electrified the

whole country by declaring that its basic wage would be $4

for an eight-hour day about $25 for a six-day week. A

four-room apartment, unheated, cost $25 a month. A job at

Ford spelled "gold mine."

 

My brother-in-law worked at Ford at that time, and he

believed he could get me a job.

 

 

I came to Chicago in the fall of 1937 and went to work for

the Chicago and Western Indiana Railroad as a night police-

man protecting traffic at railroad crossings and guarding

loaded freight cars from looters. Sometimes we had a little

excitement, but generally it was monotonous work all

night, ten hours a night, seven nights a week. During the

shorter days of winter and early spring I seldom saw day-

light. After four or five years of that, I went to work for the

Catholic Archdiocese of Chicago as a maintenance engineer.

That's where I worked until 1964, when I retired at the age of

seventy-one.

 

GAA: Except from Richard McElligott report;

As many Kerry GAA clubs had only recently formed, some had trouble adapting to the finer points of Gaelic football such as the concept of positional play. In their match with the Knockanure Volunteers, Lixnaw easily proved the superior team winning 1-11 to nil. This was due to Knockanure apparently being in blissful ignorance of the knack of distributing themselves on the field. As a consequence their players were always in a clutter and when the Lixnaw men gained possession of the ball, they had little difficulty in sending it home.

 

30 November 1889. Clubs affiliated were: Abbeydorney, Aghadoe, Ballyduff, Ballymcelligott, Caherciveen, Camp, Callinafercy, Castlegregory, Castleisland, Cordal, Currans, Dingle, Irremore, Keel, Kenmare, Killarney, Killorglin Laune Rangers, Kilmoyley, Knockanure, Knocknagoshel, Lispole, Listowel, Listry, Lixnaw, Milltown, Muckross, O'Brennan, Rathmore, Tralee Mitchels, Tralee Red Hughs, Tralee Amateur, Tuogh and Waterville.

 

Weeshie's Week

• Back to Weeshie's Week

Tribute to Dr. Michael Brosnan

January 18th, 2011

by Ger Walsh - Journalist and Radio Presenter

Kerry lost one of its great sporting sons with the death on Christmas eve, 2010 of Dr Michael Brosnan, late of Moyvane, Ballybunion and London.

Dr. Mick or "Bros" as he was affectionately known, had a life –long interest in all sport but he will be remembered best here in Kerry by the GAA and Golfing fraternities.

The son of legendary Kerry footballer Con Brosnan, Mick grew up in Moyvane amongst a strong footballing tradition and along with his brother Jim, his first forays on the Gaelic fields of Kerry were in the green and gold of Moyvane.

Secondary education took him to Rockwell College in Tipperary where he excelled at all sports including rugby and he went on to captain the Rockwell team to Munster Junior Cup victory in 1947. As Captain of the North Kerry team who won the County Minor Championship in 1949, Mick was then selected to Captain the Kerry Minor team of 1950, who went on to All-Ireland glory, beating Wexford in the final at Croke Park.

In fact, Mick is something of a unique sportsman of his generation, in that he captained both a Rugby team and a Gaelic football team to victories whilst avoiding the infamous "Ban" and it was something that he often spoke about and was very proud of indeed. Also on the Kerry Minor team that day was Sean Walsh from Ballybunion who was to become a life-long friend and the man who would persuade Mick to join Ballybunion Golf Club in 1956 for the princely sum of £5.

University was next on the agenda for Mick, having left Rockwell, and he headed for UCC to study medicine where he also found time to play rugby, Sigerson Cup football and the odd game of golf at nearby Muskerry. Around this time too, his sterling displays with both U.C.C and his native Moyvane, brought him to the attention of the Kerry senior selectors and he joined the Kerry panel winning an All-Ireland Senior title against Armagh in 1953 alongside his brother Jim and great friends that included Colm Kennelly(RIP), Tom Moriarty(RIP) and Bobby Buckley.

London beckoned upon qualification as a doctor and although attached to Millwall F.C. as club Doctor for a period, Mick began to concentrate his sporting efforts on the Royal & Ancient game of golf, joining Sundridge Park Golf Club in Kent where he would go on to attain a handicap of Scratch and represent the club at the highest level in the Perman Shield (the equivalent of our Barton Shield) as well as becoming club Captain in 1981.

>From the beginning of his time in London, he would holiday annually in Ballybunion and eventually build a home there, where he and his family would visit several times a year to play golf and meet up with their huge circle of local friends. In fact, the Brosnan home has always been a wonderful gathering place for people from all codes of sport and Mick and his wife Caroline were always most welcoming hosts who liked nothing better than to entertain and chat for endless hours about golf, horses, soccer, rugby and of course the GAA.

Having been a member since 1956, Ballybunion Golf club afforded him the opportunity of being Club President in 1996 and this was probably the highlight of his golfing career. Mick was very proud of his association with Ballybunion and was always first to promote the club abroad whenever he happened to meet with fellow golfers. He was immensely proud too of the achievements of his two sons Mike(RIP) and James who both attained low single digit handicaps and played amateur golf at the highest level in the UK whilst his only daughter Kate, upheld the family sporting tradition with her prowess in equestrian sports.

Upon retirement a number of years ago, Mick would spend more and more time in Ballybunion, but sadly, he did not enjoy the best of health to play his beloved course. A knee operation restricted his ability to play golf but he liked nothing better than to sit in his folding chair on the practice fairway and impart his golfing knowledge to his grandchildren and anyone else who was interested in improving their game.

He died following a short illness at his home in Blackheath, London in the early hours of Christmas Eve morning surrounded by his loving family.

Pre-deceased by his son Mike in 2006, Mick is survived by his wife Caroline, daughter Kate and son James as well as his son-in-law Kevin and his adoring grandchildren as well as his brothers Gerry (Moyvane) and Jim (Dingle) and nieces and nephews. A larger than life character who could belt out a song with the best of them, he always spoke his mind and he will be remembered fondly by his many friends from all walks of life both here and in the UK.

He will be buried in St John's Cemetery Ballybunion this coming weekend alongside his son Mike.

Rest in Peace Bros.

 

 

Calling all graduates of UCC

 

Dr Michael B. Murphy

President

University College Cork

 

is pleased to invite graduates and friends to

 

A Lecture Evening & Reception

To Celebrate UCC’s Connections with County Kerry

 

A Great Kerry Academic & Public Man: President Alfred O’Rahilly, UCC

by Professor John A Murphy, Emeritus Professor of History, UCC

&

Reflections of a UCC Graduate

by Dr Denis Brosnan, Founder Kerry Group Plc

with guest of honour,

 

Mr Jimmy Deenihan TD,

Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht

 

from 7.30pm – 9.30pm

 

on Monday, 28 May 2012

 

 

in St John’s Theatre, The Square, Listowel, Co. Kerry

A Reception will follow the Lecture at 8.30pm

 

 

Please forward this email to any UCC graduates you know who may be interested in attending.

 

RSVP by 22 May 2012 (as numbers are limited.

Please include your home address)

 

 

by Domhnall de Barra

 

“Ireland’s Music Day”

 

Ireland’s Music Day is on June 21st, the longest day of the year, and is being organised throughout the country by the Music Network in association with Comhaltas Ceoltóirí Éireann. Athea branch are doing their bit by having an open air session of music and platform dancing starting at 8pm. The platform is ready to be laid in some central venue and, weather permitting, there will also be a bar-b-que on the night It is an opportunity to celebrate our culture and have a bit of craic to take our minds off the state of the Euro, austerity and the doom and gloom that seems to be constantly on our radios and TVs.

A big thank you to West Limerick Set dancing Club who have given us the loan of their platform for the occasion. Platform dancing played a big part in rural entertainment up to the middle of the last century. A platform would be erected at a crossroads (there was one at Leahy’s Cross in Gortnagross) and musicians who provided the music got paid by the dancers. I assume it would be quite a small amount as there wasn’t much money in circulation at the time. I am reliably informed that a great time was had by all who attended and there was even the odd match made ! Let’s hope the evening is fine on the 21st and we can relive the days of yore.

 

Games we used to play

The platform dancing got me thinking of other customs and pastimes we had that have now gone by the wayside. “Pitch and Toss” was one of our favourites in our school days, if we had the pennies. The game was simple, a combination of skill and chance. For those of you who may not be familiar with this sport; a “jack” was placed on the ground (this could be a small stone or similar) and players took turns tossing pennies from an agreed distance with a view to being as close as possible to the jack. Whoever was closest got to toss all the pennies in the air. Those that came down with heads turned up were his for the keeping, the remainder went to the second nearest who tossed them and so on until every coin had turned up heads. There was many an argument about who was closest and “measures” had to be taken. The adults had much more serious games and some people became very skilful indeed, making a profit every time they played.

“Tops” were also much in evidence during playtime at school. There were two kinds of top; the “pegging” top and the “flogging” top. The top was about the size of an average pear with a metal spike coming from the narrow end. With the pegging variety, a string was wound tightly around the body of the top and the player would throw it away from him holding on to one end of the string which caused the top to spin before it hit the ground. If the throw was executed correctly the top hit the ground spinning and stayed spinning for quite a while. The winner was the player who had the longest spin. Flogging tops were released in much the same way but the string was part of a whip. As the top was spinning it could be lashed with the whip and a skilful player could keep it going, sometimes changing direction, for a long time. In general the boys had the pegging tops and the girls used the whip. Simple pleasures but not without an element of skill and dexterity.

Handball was very popular also at that time. Some people were lucky enough to live near an alley while others made do with a convenient gable wall. We were so fond of the game that we would go to school in Abbeyfeale an hour early in the morning to have a few games before the first class. We usually lined up along the back wall at the alley up the back road waiting for our turn to try and win a point and stay serving for a while. Whenever a point was lost the server had to take his place at the back of the line again. Sometimes we played “double alley”. This involved using the sidewall as the main wall and doubling off the other side wall. You had to be quick on your feet for this game but we were young and fit so there was no problem. Two of the great skills were serving and butting. A good server could place the ball so that it caressed the side wall and made it almost impossible to return. The “dead butt” was a point winner as the ball struck the bottom of the wall a fraction of an inch above the floor and rolled back not giving the opponent a chance of hitting it. The alley on the Glin road saw some memorable games. I heard people talking of an epic encounter between our own Timmy Woulfe and the great Moss Colbert of Abbeyfeale. Does anyone remember who won? It is a pity that more young people don’t get involved in the game at local level. It is a game of great skill and great exercise, at least it would get them off the play stations for a while.

Finally, another game of skill that has disappeared; rings. Again when I was growing up there was a ring board in almost every pub and they were to be seen behind the door in many private houses. The board had rows of hooks, each with a different value and the object was to throw the rubber rings at the board so that they would snag on a particular hook. The higher the value the better as each score was added to the previous throw until an agreed total had been reached. The game had to end on an exact throw, a bit like the double in darts, so accuracy was essential. The ring boards were eventually replaced by darts which became extremely popular and remain so to this day. It is a pity the two games could no co-exist.

 

 

 

by Pat Brosnan

 

Memories of a Castle

Recently some of our own girls visited Rathfarnham Castle in South Dublin which is now under the control of the Office of Public Works. Looking out from the main entrance to the grounds and the Castle there is a fine view of some of the Dublin mountains and particularly the ruins of the famous or maybe rather infamous Hellfire Club which is situated on the side of the mountain that overlooks Rathfarnham, Ballyboden and other outskirts of the City. The most reason that our family members were interested in visiting the Castle was because of hearing from me of my experience of having worked there back in the nineteen forties when the huge structure was owned and run by the Jesuit Order and where we were members of the staff at the time.

The building was divided into two main sections at the time, there was the Juniorite where the trainee priests were accommodated and where they studied, they also cycled on weekdays to attend University College. Of course there were many other subsections in the main building, the Brothers and Priests rooms, the large Refectory where all the community had their meals together, the staff quarters and the dining room which was known as the staff hall. Some of the farm workers as well as some of the indoor staff and members of the maintenance staff were also accommodated in separate outside buildings and there was a gate lodge where the dairyman and his family lived.

The 20th century had brought many changes to the Castle after it was purchased together with part of the estate in 1913 by the Society of Jesus who are better known as the Jesuits. While they maintained the structure and the main rooms of the Castle in good condition they added two large wings during the 1920 period to accommodate a hall of residence for the seminary and a Retreat House and Chapel. There was also a lovely Chapel in the older building. Fr. John Sullivan whom we heard a lot about when we worked there was a candidate for canonization and he was also Rector for a short period during the 1930’s.

It is my belief however that those of us who were working on the staff of the Castle had not much real interest in the previous history of the place as we were more pre-occupied with some of our own day to day problems, small wages and long working hours. The advertisement for indoor staff members which appeared in “The Kerryman” which got me the job mentioned good wages, turned out to be 15shillings a week with a deduction of one shilling and three pence for insurance contribution. Perhaps if we worked in the Retreat House over a weekend we might get four or five more shillings from tips left by those who came on retreat there. Those who came on retreat there were mostly Dublin working class people from various occupations bus drivers and conductors one week, the next week gasworks employees and so forth. The rules for those on retreat were very strict, no talking among themselves or with the staff, complete silence over the entire weekend until the breakfast on Monday mornings when they were allowed to converse freely. Those of us in the indoor staff got one half day off each week in the afternoon, no fixed working hours, no minimum wage and of course no trade union membership. Those on the outdoor and farm staff however were in a different category altogether, fixed working hours and much higher wages. We in the indoor staff were to required to attend early Mass seven days a week and we were also more or less compelled to be back in our rooms by 10.30pm at night which gave us little opportunity to attend dances in the city or even go to see a film. But however it was a job and we were glad to have it. Many of the community were nice people, but like in every other walk of life the religious community in Rathfarnham had its quota of snobs, who more or less considered working people to be a lesser breed, but on the other hand some members of the community there were wonderful people who treated us with dignity and respect. After leaving there some of the community wrote to me, particularly late Fr. Hugh Mulhall and Brother Paddy Brady, both now deceased. When brother Brady was stationed at the Jesuit House in O’Connell Stree, Limerick which was since sold it was great to meet up with him again on one occasion after all the years. During our time working at the Castle the staff used to play a lot of handball, there were two fine ball alleys there so we became useful at the game a least it was not in this context anyway all work and no play. We used to run handball competitions for the staff as well.

The original castle at Rathfarnham dates back to the Elizabethan period and was built for Archbishop Adam Loftus, a Yorkshire clergyman who came to Ireland as a chaplain to the Lord deputy and who quickly rose to become Archbishop of Dublin and Lord Chancellor of Ireland and who was closely involved with the establishment of Trinity College. In our own time working at the Castle, one of the brothers in the community was by coincidence named John Loftus who was a native of Mayo. It would be extremely doubtful if he was a relation of the original Bishop Loftus for whom the castle was built. There were many stories about the castle that we never heard about while working there. For instance we were not aware that the place was supposed to be haunted until reading an article in Ireland’s Own many years later with the title “Ghosts of Rathfarnham”. Some of the Kerry lads who worked with me at the castle have now gone to their reward, but some years ago Joe Cronin from Beaufort found out by chance where we lived and visited us a couple of times and we also met him on another occasion at Scartaglin Féile Cheoil. Joe was one of my best friends when we were in Rathfarnham but sadly he has died in recent years. Who would have thought back in the late forties that the Jesuits would sell the property and leave before the end of the 20th century, as the order seemed to be so well established there. But then again they have also left Mungret College and sold the Church and house in O’Connell Street, Limerick. The Office of Public Works is now in full charge of what has been termed “A fortified house” and this historic building is now a visitor’s centre where there are guided tours and talks on the history of the place. It seems strange indeed that members of my own family are now visitors to a place where we were once staff members working from early morning until late at night very often for the weekly wage of 15 shillings less 1 and 3 pence insurance contributions and of course our meals and accommodation in this ancient castle. It was nevertheless an experience that played a role in the shaping of our lives.

 

 

WALK: Just came across these few lines recently “You’ve had a long hard day at home or at work – you’re stressed, tired and not interested in doing much or maybe you’re out of work at the moment, bored, worried, frustrated and running out of options when it comes to paying the bills. Either way there’s something at your disposal which costs nothing, is a natural anti-depressant, lowers cholesterol and high blood pressure and releases feel-good hormones in your brain. This is no “wonder drug” with unpleasant side effects, it’s the simple act of ‘Walking’. Because it’s so simple we underestimate just how effective it can be in maintaining and restoring good health. We are designed to move about! The benefits have surpassed those derived from taking anti-depressants, without any of the side effects. In other words turn off the TV or computer for an hour or two and get outdoors instead – as they say in hail, rain or snow! And what about it if you do get wet – it won’t harm us. It’s great to see many parents with their kids these day doing the ring on their bikes and cyclists have really multiplied in numbers. There’s a great sociability in walking or cycling but also it can be a great time for contemplation”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Way We Were

I was just thinking the other day about how much things have changed in our world in a very short time. I am now 70 years old but in the relatively short time since I started going to school, I have experienced the greatest changes since the world began. In the late 1940s/early 50s there was no electricity, no running water, no telephone, no toilets,  no TV, very few radios and a couple of cars in the parish. The roads were mainly stone and pencil with just the main routes tarred. If somebody who was born in recent times was somehow transported back to those days, they would not have a hope of surviving but we had no problem and took all the changes in our stride as they occurred. There were jobs to be done in those days that have been mostly forgotten about now. Even the terms used to describe them will be foreign to the younger generations. “Spreading top dress” was one of those. Cows were kept in the shed over the winter months and they were provided with a fresh bed of rushes every day. Of course the old stuff had to be piked out onto the dung heap outside the door. This heap grew over the months so when spring came and the weather improved it was filled into a horse drawn cart with a four prong pike and dumped in heaps in the meadows. When the time was right the farmer, or his servant boy, spread the manure, again with a four prong pike. This was known as spreading top dress and it was a very natural way of ensuring a good growth of grass. The four prong pike was one of three that were in use in those days. It was used mainly for rushes, cut briars and the like. The three prong was used for piking turf in the bog and the two prong was reserved for hay in the meadow. Different types of spades were also in use. An old worn one was used to dig the spuds while a good sharp one was used   for “turning taobh fhóds”. This was getting the garden ready to sow spuds. A line of string was stretched along the ground and a line cut with a hay knife along it.  Another line was cut paralleled to this one about four feet apart. Then a spade was used to turn sods from each side to meet in the middle. This was hard work and required precision with the depth and length of cut. This was left until the “seeds” were ready to be sown. Seed potatoes had little “eyes” from which sprouts appeared. Sometimes the potato could be cut in two, as long as there were enough eyes. The sods that had been turned were now folded back and farm yard manure was spread along the ridge. The seeds were then placed on top of the manure and the sods turned back again. To complete the operation the space between the ridges was dug up and the earth placed on top of the ridge, enough to prevent the frost from getting at the seeds but not too much to keep the sun’s heat from them.

 

“Scouring the dyke” was another spring activity.  The dyke (which was really a ditch) carried water from the land drains and had to be cleaned out every year to ensure the “run of the water” as it was called. This was done with a spade, shovel and four prong pike. At the same time a briar hook or “slasher” was used to cut bushes and briars that grew on the ditch (which was really a dyke!). Most people in those days had a garden. The farmers had plenty of ground to till and cottages were built on an acre so that a garden was possible. Spuds were the main crop as well as cabbage, turnips, carrots, parsnips, mangolds, lettuce, peas, beans, beetroot etc.  Farmers also sat oats for the horses who pulled all the carts and machinery. The oats required a lot of work, cutting, binding, putting into sheafs and eventually being threshed to separate the ears from the straw. Before machines arrived on the scene the threshing was done with a flail. The flail consisted of two sticks connected by a short chain. One stick was wielded by hand and the other stick would come down on the oats which was placed on a concrete floor and sever the head from the body. Hard work indeed but very rewarding and necessary for survival before the arrival of Tescos, Aldi and the likes. I might return to this later but it is no harm for people to be grateful for the sacrifices our forefathers made so that we would have an easier life.

 

Domhnall de Barra

A Move to the Left

 

 

 

So, the unthinkable has happened and the world is reeling from the news that, despite all predictions, Donald Trump is the next president of the USA. If somebody wrote a book or a film about a man who had no political background or experience, is totally un-pc, insults women and ethnic minorities, threatens war on illegal immigrants, says global warming is a fabrication of the Chinese, wants to build a wall to keep the Mexicans out and wants to tear up all trade agreements and has no defined policies could take on his own party first, then the might of the Clinton regime and get elected president, that author would be laughed out of every producer’s and publisher’s office.

 

 

 

Yet, once again, truth is stranger than fiction. How did everyone get it so wrong and what now for the market researchers and pollsters who claim to have made a science out of predictions. It is a wake-up call for all politicians. For too long those who govern have been far removed from the ordinary people they have vowed to help and instead have cosied up to bankers and business people who fund their electoral campaigns and look forward to the “quid pro quo” after they have gained power. Western governments, in particular, have succeeded in making billionaires out of millionaires while the lot of the common man has deteriorated. There is so much wealth in the world that nobody should have less than a decent living wage but our rulers, who believe in the capitalist system, haven’t the courage to take the steps necessary to reverse the huge gulf that is growing between those at the top and those at the bottom. They even protected the gambling investors when the financial crash came and then made ordinary workers pay the bill. No wonder there is a revolt among the working classes and a huge swing to the left. Donald Trump is a very clever man. He told the American electorate exactly what they wanted to hear. They were fed up of the same old mantra, time after time, and looked for an alternative to the status quo. Keep telling a people they are great, that they belong to the greatest nation on earth, that non-Americans are inferior beings who are taking their jobs, raping their women and posing a threat to national security, and eventually they will believe it. If you don’t think so just read a bit of history from the last century. Adolf Hitler did that to the German people and look at his legacy. I  am not suggesting for a moment that Donald Trump is in any way like Adolf Hitler but it would be foolish in the extreme to ignore the signs in many countries at the moment. The French left are gaining ground day by day, Brexit has proved that the British establishment is totally out of touch with the working class people and here at home we have a government that is a bit like the house that Jack built, made up of the two main civil war parties and a group of independents. The people spoke and told the two mighty parties what they thought of them. They also elected the independents who promised to look after their local issues and people from the left wing parties who champion the rights of the ordinary man and woman.

 

 

 

I must admit to having great admiration for some of the opposition members in the Dáil. The contributions of Claire Daly and Mick Wallace have been immense. Mary Lou McDonald, Pierce Doherty, Ruth Coppinger, Paul Murphy, Richard Boyd Barrett and others are extremely good at getting their points across and the government would be very foolish to try and fob them off as cranks. One may not agree with their politics but it is a fact that their supporters are growing in numbers and will soon be a major force for change in this country.

 

 

 

We are witnessing a remarkable period in our history and I sincerely hope that the politicians will take a lesson from the brexit result in Britain and the election of Donald Trump in America. They must put the citizens of the country before their friends in high places and ensure that the Ireland Con Colbert and his comrades died for is not a myth. I am not sure the heroes of 1916 would be too happy if they came back and saw what we have achieved with the freedom they made the ultimate sacrifice for.

 

 

 

In the meantime we hold our breath in trepidation, waiting to see how the most powerful man in the world is going to rule. There are checks and balances through the house of representatives and the senate but he will have the nuclear codes and has the ability to plunge us all into the abyss. Let us pray that the man we saw during the election is not the real Trump and that he will be ready to take  proper advice from those who are more experienced than he is.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Domhnall de Barra

 

 

 

 

 

DANNY JOHNSON   FROM  DROMORE AREA OF CO. DOWN

 

 

 

STORY BEHIND MAKING MYSELF A BODHRAN IN 1972 

 

By 1971, when I was 19years old, I had just completed a 4year apprentice in bricklaying in my home area. At the local college I met another student who was from Belfast (Stephen Connor )and

 

we had completed the qualifications in bricklaying plus a higher  construction certificate.

 

We decided to go to the Republic of Ireland  together as a new venture!

 

I had “hitched”a lift to Cork and back to look for work as well as a bit of adventure! A job was found whilst there.

 

In August '71 we met in my home town and set off with our tools over our shoulders and very little extra clothing to “hitch” it again to Cork, to the job. We didn't have the luxury of cars as neither of us had a drivers licence.

 

The very first car that we “hitched” stopped! The man said “Where are you going?We said “Cork”

 

He said “I'm going to Limerick” Without hesitation we said we would go there too!

 

Seven hours later, at around 3:30 to 4pm we were in Limerick with nowhere to stay and no job.

 

This is hard to believe but at 5:30pm we not only had a bedsit at 14 Lower Mallow St. but a job for the next morning with the local  building firm “ Lanagan Brothers.”  We loved the adventure!

 

We stayed in Limerick until Christmas and then went back home as Stephen's brother (I think) wanted him to work with him in Belfast, despite all the  trouble there.

 

 

 

I worked self-employed on building  projects around my home area for a few months and got my driving test and purchased a dream car for £70 from my sister.  A navy blue Morris Miner 1000. It was as good as a Rolls Royce to me and I could go anywhere! It was 1972 and I was 20yrs old and thought I was very mature and a man of the world.

 

Soon I hit the road again on my own. Straight to Limerick again and got a short term job with Lanagan Bros again. Then I wanted to explore somewhere different  and ended up in Dungarvan Co. Waterford.

 

I met a man at a music session there and he was playing this thing that I'd never  seen before, which I learned was a bodhran I was totally fascinated by this thing as I played the accordion with limited ability but loved traditional music.

 

He told me he was a blacksmith but I don't remember his name? He was lovely to me and give me a short lesson how to play it. I really wanted one quickly. He told me about a man in Listowel in Co. Kerry who would probably sell me one, as he made them. His name was Sonny Canavan. The next day (a Sat) I was off to find him. With the help of the locals in Listowel I landed at his house.

 

 

 

I was totally fascinated with everything about him. My memories are of his little white cottage with a half door and a herd of goats all grazing around in the grass/bogland  surrounding the house. He looked smallish and carrying  no excess weight, he had one damaged eye and wore a cap. He was a lovely little man and very friendly and helpful.

 

He didn't have any spare bodhrans to sell me, unfortunately, but we had a long chat and he told me he had 70 goats at this time and he sent a lot of his bodhrans  to America and elsewhere.

 

He explained how they were made including that the best goat would be a 3yr old female as one of less age might be I bit “tinny” meaning sounding like beating a tin box whereas a goat too

 

 old would sound too” dull/dead”.

 

He told me he put “salt peter on the flesh side of the skin to cure it and lime on the hair side, then  the hair would come out easily after the specified period of time. He told me to bury the skin in the ground for 2 weeks but I didn't remember why he said that. I assume it was for total protection and it would cure best that way but I'm not totally sure. 

 

Next was to stretch the skin on a board after lifting it from the ground as well as plucking  the hair out and that was the total sum of  the information he give me.

 

To me this was plenty to spur me to have a go myself when back home and try making one. I thought, well he is human like myself and if he can do it why wouldn't I be able to,   

 

as I was a practical person. At 20yrs old there's a tendency to think you could do anything and a lot of the time you would be wrong!

 

I was in Thurles Co Tipperary not long after and having learned that salt peter could be purchased in a chemist, that's where I went. I think I got 2 to 3lbs in weight (just more than 1kg) What I hadn't realised, as I discovered some time later was that it was used for making bombs. Probably could have got plenty  in Belfast around that time if I'd known who to contact!!  Being a good boy, that would definitely have been an No No. Wasn't I lucky I didn't get stopped by the security forces on the way across the border. I  didn't even know about the bomb thing at that stage.

 

The only thing I needed now was A GOAT!!

 

I was very fit at this time as I did fell running competitively, (racing over mountains) road running and cycling,also played a bit of Gaelic. I might have been the fittest one on theGaelic field but I was no star at it. This all give me the groundwork to hunt for a goat.

 

There were some goats in the local Mourne Mountains, so when most young men were hunting for females around the Mourne Mt. area I was hunting for goats as well as the  females! No luck in the mountains,only disappointment.

 

Around this time I had  built my first of many private bungalows,  usually for farmers. (the ones with the money, then.

 

It was for a farmer& digger contractor. His Christian name was Coulter. He told he had seen a lot of wild goats in his fields lately. No medals for guessing what's coming next. The hunt was on!!!

 

Sure enough there must have been 20 goats. Some with horns and some without.

 

The”training gear” was put  on and away I went. I was sort of spoiled for choice so I made the decision to focus on a female one. She was a fine looking young female as goats go. Not quite like the ones I'd chased in the local dance halls at weekends!!

 

I chased her for almost 3 hrs, over fields and through the hedges where there were broken gaps. The farmer/ diggerman had stopped the digger work that he was doing on the farm and had sat there in the digger for the whole time watching. He said he hadn't been so entertained in his life and glad he wasn't the one doing the running. The  poor thing was exhausted when I finally caught her.

 

I had to carry her home for almost 3 miles. Of course I had to take plenty or rests on the way home.

 

I finally got home and hid the goat in an old outhouse so that my parents wouldn't  suspect anything. They were away at my uncles house so it couldn't have been better for me. They would have no reason to go to the outhouse as it was sitting empty for a long time.  I had talked with  the local butcher in town and he agreed he would  do the job professionally at a different local farmer's house if I was lucky to catch one, so the plan to take the goat away next morning was in place, (as my parents went shopping am), to  take it to the farmyard nearby. I was lucky I had the sense to work to a good plan and my parents wouldn't be upset. You see my mother, especially, was a very religious woman and there wasn't a cruel bone in her body. She loved animals.

 

As planned I went to the outhouse to take the goat away, as they were gone, all was running like clockwork!!

 

What happened next was not quite as I'd planned. The goat was gone??  I couldn't believe what I wasn't seeing,  only an empty outhouse??

 

To this day I never knew what happened to that goat. Nothing was ever hinted by my late parents and no one in our family of 7 of us ever talked about  how the goat disappeared. I can only assume it might have made a noise and they let it out or  it didn't have to make a noise because they maybe  sensed something not normal about my behaviour.  As my late mother used to say “God only knows”.

 

 

 

Time lapsed and I came to accept what had happened.

 

I would not give up that easily. So, plan B was put in place soon after.

 

I would summons my older brother to come with me in my morris minor 1000 car. I avoided our    house this time or anywhere  near it, so  instead we planned to take  the potential goat directly to the same farm as before and keep our mouths shut to my family. This meant re- routing our journey.

 

Away we went as we had pre-arranged with the farmer/digger contractor, back for Hunt 2, as the herd of goats were still in the fields.

 

My brother and the digger man were the spectators this time. After hunting  for over 2hrs  I

 

caught a goat that I'd focused on at the start. It had horns but looked fresh. This was my version of the best one for a bodhran, that was available. A Morris Minor wasn't a big car so we decided the only way to get it where we wanted was somehow try to work something with the car. You have probably guessed we got it into the back seat of the car and my brothers job was to hold it by the handlebars/horns to keep it from jumping through the window. We had to go through our local town of Dromore on a Friday around 5pm. The main road from Belfast to Dublin was through  the centre of Dromore at that time and there was always heavy traffic including heavy lorries and buses and there were a lot of traffic jambs sometimes and worst usually on a Friday. We had no alternative but to come through to avoid being spotted by our family. We were probably seen by the passing motorists on their way to Dublin or elsewhere, as the traffic was just creeping along at the time. We did have locals on the street waving and pointing at the car. How embarrassing for us. It wasn't what we wanted but had to be done.

 

We got to the designated farm and the butcher came  the next evening and done what  he had to do and allowed me to help him take the precious skin off.

 

As we had no freezer the butcher stored the carcase in his premises until it was to be used. He got some of it, another farmer who was a friend got some and I took some as well, so it wasn't wasted and very nice it was to eat. I buried the skin in a field belonging to the friend farmer  for the 2 weeks and went through the rest of the procedures and finally finished my version of a bodhran.

 

It wasn't a top of the range one as I didn't know how to steam bend ash so I had to use plywood instead. I left a little extra piece of the skin protruding with hair on it to indicate that it was real goat skin. I also had to  remove and re- skin the frame as I wasn't entirely happy with the tightness of first effort.  Although it wasn't up to Sonny Canavan's standard and it isn't an adjustable frame and sometimes I had to hold it to a fire occasionally or use a damp cloth the odd time to slacken a little.

 

Having said all this it was very playable and was known and commented by people to have a very good tone when at the  a nice tightness.

 

I've had a lot of fun with it and I think about Sonny Canavan every time I tell the story about it, or play it. It's a bit like myself, it's passed it's best but still very playable. I've still to decide if it will go to the grave with me or go to  my musical  nephew or niece?

 

 

 

Incidentally, my friend from Belfast, who was in Limerick with me and I got jobs around the same time in the neighbouring Further Education colleges, both teaching construction. I  also taught Special Needs and Leisure & Tourism  students and when the 2 colleges amalgamated we both then  worked together again. I took early retirement and was 7 yrs on the Mourne Mt. Rescue Team, (After early  Retirement) until I got laboured with a health issue.  We are both now officially Pensioners as we are 65yrs old at the time of writing this little story.