SHIP from TRALEE to America



Ship Gipsey

 

 

Tralee, Ireland to New York
23 June 1852
sample list



151 Mary Leary 30 female wife Ireland United States
152* Pat Leary 4 female Ireland United States
153 John Leary 7mon female infant Ireland United States
154 John Doody 30 male farmer Ireland United States
155 Pat Dwyer 48 male mason Ireland United States
156 Danl Dwyer 19 male laborer Ireland United States
157 Ann Dwyer 19 female spinister Ireland United States
158 Julia Dwyer 13 female spinister Ireland United States
159* John Dwyer 11 female Ireland United States
160 Eugene McCarthy 22 male laborer Ireland United States
161 Honora Pierce 18 female spinister Ireland United States
162 Mary Mannix 18 female spinister Ireland United States
163 Nanno Mannix 20 female spinister Ireland United States
164* Jerh Kennally 19 male laborer Ireland United States
165 John Connor 18 male laborer Ireland United States
166 John Heally 28 male laborer Ireland United States
167 Mary Heally 20 female spinister Ireland United States
168 John Spillane 19 male tailor Ireland United States
169 Dennis Foley 24 male laborer Ireland United States
170 Johanna Foley 15 female spinister Ireland United States
171 John Landers 18 male laborer Ireland United States
172 John McCarthy 20 male laborer Ireland United States
173 Dennis Morow 20 male laborer Ireland United States
174 Denis Cunan 20 male laborer Ireland United States
175 no passenger listed
176 John Mc Carthy 18 male laborer Ireland United States
177 Michl Frinton 21 male laborer Ireland United States
178 Mary Frinton 14 female spinister Ireland United States
179 Judy Spillane 36 female widow Ireland United States
180* Mary Spillane 6 female Ireland United States
181 Michl Griffin 35 male laborer Ireland United States
182 Norry Kevin 20 female spinister Ireland United States
183 Mary Neill 16 female spinister Ireland United States
184 Kate Conner 20 female spinister Ireland United States
185 Pat ODonnell 19 male laborer Ireland United States
186 Michl Corkery 42 male laborer Ireland United States
187* Dibby Cockery 34 male laborer Ireland United States
188 Mathew Cockery 12 male laborer Ireland United States
189* Ellen Cockery 14 female Ireland United States
190* John Cockery 10 male Ireland United States
191 Danl Mc Egan 15 male laborer Ireland United States
192 Michl Smith 18 male laborer Ireland United States
193 Pat OBien 40 male laborer Ireland United States
194 John Brien 25 male laborer Ireland United States
195 Mary Brien 60 female widow Ireland United States
196 Matthew Sullivan 18 male laborer Ireland United States
197* Jas McKenia 25 female spinister Ireland United States
198* Mary Murphy 20 male laborer Ireland United States
199* Thos Moore 34 male Ireland United States
200* Ann Moore 30 female Ireland United States
201* John Moore 10 male Ireland United States
202* Moore Inft 9mon male infant Ireland United States
203 Johana Roche 21 female spinister Ireland United States
204 Michl Sullivan 25 male laborer Ireland United States
205 Jerry Roche 30 male laborer Ireland United States
206 Mary Roche 31 female spinister Ireland United States
207 Ellen Devine 21 female spinister Ireland United States
208 Andrew MCarthy 25 male laborer Ireland United States
209 Honora Lahive 18 female spinister Ireland United States
210 Magt Hoffins 14 female spinister Ireland United States
211 David OConnell 23 male laborer Ireland United States
212 Laurence Lyons 20 male laborer Ireland United States
213 Magt Moloney 17 female spinister Ireland United States
214 Jerry Griffin 22 male laborer Ireland United States
215 Jas Griffin 25 male laborer Ireland United States
216 Mary McAuliffe 25 female spinister Ireland United States
217 Wm McMahon 10 male laborer Ireland United States
218 Mary Walsh 27 female spinister Ireland United States
219 Kate Fitzgerald 21 female spinister Ireland United States
220 Patk McM?h?? 20 male laborer Ireland United States
221 Mary McM?h?? 22 female spinister Ireland United States
222 Wm Walsh 25 male laborer Ireland United States
223 John Quilter 18 male laborer Ireland United States
224 John Callahan 30 male laborer Ireland United States
225 Cornls Cain 22 male laborer Ireland United States
226 Honora Cain 19 female spinister Ireland United States
227 Margt Hannan 18 female spinister Ireland United States
228 John Mulvihill 24 male laborer Ireland United States
229 Magt Mulvihill 24 female spinister Ireland United States
230 Ellen Mulvihill 11 months infant Ireland United States
231 Wm Foley 21 male laborer Ireland United States
232 John Foley 19 male laborer Ireland United States
233 Thos Foley 13 male laborer Ireland United States
234 Johana Foley 23 female spinister Ireland United States
235 John Jones 20 male shoemaker Ireland United States
236 Jas Enright 25 male laborer Ireland United States
237 Michl Flahive 2 male laborer Ireland United States
238 Bridget Lawler 20 female spinister Ireland United States
239 Jerry Cronin 30 male laborer Ireland United States
240* Danl Brassil 25 male laborer Ireland United States
241 Cornls Scanlen 30 male laborer Ireland United States
242 Thos. Maigaw 43 male laborer Ireland United States
243 Cathn Sullivan 36 female widow Ireland United States
244 Timty Sullivan 17 male laborer Ireland United States
245 Johanna Sullivan 13 female spinister Ireland United States
246* Mary Sullivan 11 female Ireland United States
247* Margt Sullivan 9 female Ireland United States
248 Honora Finican 26 female wife Ireland United States
249* Mary Finucan 3 female Ireland United States
250 Michl Finucan 6mon male infant Ireland United States
251 Bridget Mulvihill 22 female spinister Ireland United States
252 Jas. Dillane 50 male laborer Ireland United States
253 Ellen Fitzgerald 20 female spinister Ireland United States
254 J???? OBrien 22 male laborer Ireland United States
255 John OBrien 30 male laborer Ireland United States
256 Cathn Walsh 20 female spinister Ireland United States
257 Mary Power 50 female widow Ireland United States
258 Thade Power 22 male farmer Ireland United States
259 Margt Power 20 female spinister Ireland United States
260 Johnan Power 18 female spinister Ireland United States
261 Thos Dooling 18 male laborer Ireland United States
262 Julia Casey 15 female spinister Ireland United States
263 Luke Nullyain 50 male laborer Ireland United States
264 Cathn Nullyain 50 female wife Ireland United States
265* Bridgt Nullyain 18 female spinister Ireland United States
266* Dennis Nullyain 18 male laborer Ireland United States
267 Francis Nullyain 16 male laborer Ireland United States
268 John Nullyain 15 male laborer Ireland United States
269* Cath Nullyain 14 male Ireland United States
270* Luke Nullyain 12 male Ireland United States
271 Mary Nullyain 3mon female infant Ireland United States
272 John Ahern 28 male laborer Ireland United States
273 Margt Enright 20 female spinister Ireland United States
274 Mary Coleman 40 female wife Ireland United States
275 Mary Lynch 25 female spinister Ireland United States
276 John Buhan 24 male laborer Ireland United States
277 Johana Brophil 20 female spinister Ireland United States
278 Julia Carmody 24 female spinister Ireland United States
279 Johana Sullivan 18 female spinister Ireland United States
280 Johana Keliher 18 female spinister Ireland United States
281 John Connor 17 male laborer Ireland United States
282 Cath McMahon 22 female spinister Ireland United States
283 Patk Connor 28 male laborer Ireland United States
284* John Hartnt 16 male laborer Ireland United States
285* John Hartnet 22 male laborer Ireland United States
286 John Sullivan 21 male laborer Ireland United States
287 John Walsh 30 male laborer Ireland United States
288 Denis Begley 25 male laborer Ireland United States
289 Mary Sullivan 18 female spinister Ireland United States
290 John Moran 40 male laborer Ireland United States
291 Margt Moran 36 female spinister Ireland United States
292* Michl Moran 11 male Ireland United States
293* Mary Moran 10 female Ireland United States
294* Cathn Moran 9 female Ireland United States
295* Bridget Moran 7 female Ireland United States
296 Jas Moran 10mon male infant Ireland United States
297 Cathn Moran 24 female spinister Ireland United States
298 John Davane 30 male servant Ireland United States
299 Mgt Davane 27 female spinister Ireland United States
300 Michl Dummond? 50 male laborer Ireland United States
301 Danl Cummons? 32 male laborer Ireland United States
302 Alice Cummons ? 14 female spinister Ireland United States

Cabin Passengers

303 Mrs B Hare 23 male cor????tin Ireland United States
304 Mr Denis OKeeffe 19 male clerk Ireland United States
305 Mr Jas McElligott 24 male farmer Ireland United States
306 Mr Mchl McLoughlin 30 male clerk Ireland United States
307 Mrs Eliza McLoughlin 28 male Ireland United States
308 Mr John Dond 27 male farmer Ireland United States
309 Mr Michl Carroll 22 male farmer Ireland United States
310 Miss Mgt Carroll 32 female spinister Ireland United States
311 Mr Andrew Carroll 22 male farmer Ireland United States
312 Miss Honora Cunningham 22 female spinister Ireland United States
313 Miss Mgt Sullivan 18 female spinister Ireland United States
314* Miss Mary Enright 21 male spinister Ireland United States
315* Mr Jerk McCarthy 29 male architect Ireland United States
316 Mrs Johana McCarthy 24 female wife Ireland United States
317 Miss Ann Culhane 16 female spinister Ireland United States
318 Miss Ellen F?shy 22 female spinister Ireland United States
319 Mr Martin Mahoney 24 male machanic Ireland United States
320 Miss Honora McYoung 23 female spinister Ireland United States
321 Mr Wm Horgan 15 male clerk Ireland United States

 

 

Ballylongford Information

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ballylongford (Co. Kerry / North)

Ballylongford (Béal Átha Longfoirt – “Anchorage Ford Mouth”) (pop. 410) is a village situated at the top of Carrigafoyle Creek on the River Shannon Estuary.

 

The area was long dominated by the O’Connors of Kerry. Under Cromwell’s Act for the Settlement of Ireland 1652, all O’Connor lands were confiscated, and in 1666 wer granted to Trinity College Dublin, which remained the principal landlord in the Ballylongford area up to the passage of the Wyndham Land Act 1903. Indeed, some land titles are still vested in the college to this day.

 

The modern village dates from the end of the C18th, though a bridge over the ford existed long before then. The old bridge was destroyed by floods on 10th June, 1926, “ A concrete bridge was completed in 1930.

 

Michael O’Rahilly (The O’Rahilly), one of the founders of the Irish Volunteers in 1914, killed in the 1916 Easter Rising, was born in the village in 1875. Finucane’s Public House, which was formerly the O’Rahilly family’s business premises. Ballylongford GAA branch is known as “O’Rahilly’s Gaelic Football Club”.

 

Eddie Carmody, a local Irish Volunteer leader honoured by a memorial Hall

 

 

 

 

Carrigafoyle Island (pop. 13) in the Shannon Estuary is joined to the mainland by a small bridge and a spit of marshy, grassy land, covered only by high spring tides. In addition to its Castle, the island also has an inhabited farm and a Napoleonic era defence battery.

 

 

 

Carrigafoyle Castle was built by Conchuir Liath Uí Conchuir (Connor Liath O’Connor) between 1490 and 1500, and thereafter used to “inspect” ships passing to and from the port of Limerick.

 

 

 

The Siege of Carrigafoyle Castle began on Palm Sunday in 1580 during the Second Desmond Rebellion, and lasted two days. The castle was defended by an Italian, Captain Julian, at the head of 70 Papal / Spanish / Irish troops. Sir William Pelham`s forces successfully breached the defences with cannon fire, the survivors were all hanged, and the Earl of Desmond’s silver plate, stored in the dungeon, was confiscated and sent to London.

 

 

 

Towards the end of the Nine Years War Chieftain John O’Connor briefly re-occupied the castle only to be evicted in 1603 by Sir George Carew, Lord President of Munster. King James I restored the castle to the O’Connors in 1607, but it was again captured in 1651 by Cromwellian forces under Henry Ireton’s deputy and, after his death, commander in chief in Ireland,

 

 

 

The castle, now listed as a National Monument, stands almost 30m high, and its battlements provide excellent views of the estuary and Scattery Island (Co Clare). In addition to fine windows and archways, it features a spiral staircase of 104 steps, ascending clockwise to the disadvantage of any right-handed attacker, which visitors can climb.

 

Lislaughtin Abbey (Lios Laichtin - “Lachtin’s Dwelling / Fort”), on the other side of the creek, was named for Saint Lachtin, the first to preach Christianity in the area. Franciscan Friary established in 1478 by John O’Connor Kerry.

 

 

 

Once one of the most important religious institutions in County Kerry, the Abbey managed to continue to operate after King Henry VIII’s 1540 Dissolution of the Monasteries. The Friary was sacked by English soldiers in 1580, and three monks were murdered before the high altar, but their priceless processional cross remained in hiding until found years later by a local farmer; known as the Lislaughtin Cross, it is now on display in the National Museum in Dublin. The last friars did not abandon the site until the mid-C17th.

 

 

 

The Abbey and its grounds have served as the Catholic cemetery for Ballylongford.

 

The C14th Church of Aghavallin (Achadh Chonbhail – “the Hermitage Field”) was used as the Church of Ireland parish church until 1829, when the Glebe land on the opposite side of the road saw the construction of a new church (since demolished), where Henry Horatio Kitchener (1850 – 1916), Earl Kitchener of Khartoum, was baptised there.

 

Glebe House, an attractive old rectory,

 

Brendan Kennelly, one of Ireland’s most popular poets and novelists, was born in Ballylongford in 1936. There is a festival celebrating Kennelly’s work each August featuring poetry, workshops, theatre, music, dance, literary and other events. Kennelly’s Bar, his boyhood home, is popular with locals and visitors alike.

 

 

Tarbert (Co. Kerry / North)

Tarbert (Tairbeart, from an Old Norse term meaning “draw-boat”, i.e. portage) is a village on the Shannon Estuary. It was a prosperous port and garrison town during the C19th and early part of the 20th century.

 

Tarbert House, begun in 1690 by John Leslie and not completed until about 1730, is a Queen Anne / early Georgian style house that has remained in Leslie ownership to this day.

 

 

Visitors to the house over the years and have included: Dean Jonathan Swift, who famously remarked “The Leslies have lots of books upon their shelves. All written by Leslies about themselves“; Benjamin Franklin, who visited Sir Edward Leslie as part of his effort to rekindle trans-Atlantic trade relations; Daniel O’Connell, a family friend (one item on display is an 1813 plea to the British House of Commons for Catholic Emancipation signed by bishops, politicians and other notables, including “The Liberator” and his brother); Charlotte Bronte, who spent part of her honeymoon here; Horatio (later Lord) Kitchener, who lived locally as a boy, and used to gather seaweed on the foreshore for his mother’s bath to help relieve her arthritis; and Winston Churchill, who spent some of his school holidays at Tarbert House with his aunt Leonie Jerome, who was married to John Leslie.

 

 

 

Tarbert House has a fine collection of C18th furniture, including the best example of an Irish Chippendale mirror.

 

 

ANOTHER SHIP from Limerick ?

 

 

 

 

 

 

JAMES

 

 

 

James; Laidler; bark (363 tons register)

 

Sailed from LIMERICK for QUEBEC on 4/8/1834 with perhaps 251 passengers.  The James was

 

one of three vessels leaving Limerick for Quebec that April which wrecked; the others were the Astrea, and the Proseltye.

 

At that time, Limerick had no government Emigration Agent. After one was appointed,newspaper accounts suggested that some of the vessels that had previously sailed were unfit for the emigration trade. The James, it was pointedly mentioned, was almost 50 years old and referred to as

 

”...a crazy hulk inappropriated for human freight....” Limerick was not alone. About the same time, a

 

notice was published elsewhere warning the public that one Edward Walkinshaw and his agents were steering emigrants towards an unfit vessel loading at Liverpool.

 

The Limerick Chronicle collected information on the wreck of the James from other newspapers.

 

Aswell, local sources provided information on the passengers; their names had been entered in the

 

Custom—housebooks at Limerick. One listed, that of John Tuomy of Friarstown (farm labourer), is not recorded below. Prior to sailing, he met a widow who suggested he remain with her; they married. He forfeited his passage money, but likely saved his life.

 

At sea, the James experienced rough weather on the crossing. On the 25”‘or 27"‘,eastward of

 

the banks of Newfoundland, it was hit by a violent gale. This did much damage above deck while

 

throwing the ship about. After the storm had passed, the vessel began to take on water from leak or

 

leaks below. The pumps were worked repeatedly, but often choked up. One unconfirmed report, by

 

the ship's surgeon, claimed that loose potatoes were largely responsible. Emigrants had brought them in bags which tore open. Finally, when the level of water rose to the between—decks area, the captain recognized that they must abandon ship.

 

A vessel was seen in the distance which later proved to be the Margaret of Newcastle, Capt.

 

Wake. Accounts differ somewhat, but it seemed that many passengers preferred to remain with the

 

James rather than to take their chances in a small boat on a rough sea as night moved in. Perhaps the jolly boat with Capt. Laidler and ten others was the only one launched. That boat made its way to the Margaret. An hour or two later, Capt. Wake, hoisting a light, managed a boat back to where the James should have been. There was nothing.

 

It appears the survivors reached Quebec, perhaps on the Margaret.

 

 

Ship James

 

THE SHIPWRECKED PASSENGER BOOK

 

https://dcms.lds.org/delivery/DeliveryManagerServlet?dps_pid=IE3835834&from=fhd

 

 

 

 

A SURVIVORS TALE

 

New York Herald of November 16, 1854

 

The emigrant ship, New Era sailing from Bremen to New York was driven into the  New Jersey coast by a fierce gale with considerable loss of life.

 

LOUISA HAEIER [HEUER],listed among the  injured survivors, spoke (through a translator, perhaps from the Emigration office)

 

with a newspaper reporter on the scene:­

 

"The ship New Era, to which Iwas a steerage passenger, sailed from Bremen on the 28thof September; as nearly as Ican

 

reco||ect,there  were on board, when we started,four  hundred and twenty passengers; Iwas told this bythe agent of whom Isecured a

 

passage; myfellow passengers came from all parts of Germany; they were, in part, composed of farmers, or persons employed inthe

 

country, and partly of mechanics, and others residing in cities; forty-two died during the passage; Icannot give a name to the disease of

 

which they were the victims; Ionly know that, genera||y,they  sickened at nightfall, and were cold before morning; those who died

 

were, in every instance, young men from the rural districts who were, on their arrival on shipboard,fu||  of life and vigor; those

 

unfortunates had been exhausted bywant of properfood and fresh water— many ofthem having been reduced to drinkof the water of

 

the sea. There was a scarcity of provisions, and those which were given up were of very bad quality, and not half cooked; we were

 

compelled to hire cooks from amongthe passengers for ourse|ves;that there was no sickness among the women and children must be

 

ascribed to the fact that they preserved the tea and coffee given them to use sparingly at the intervals which nature compelled; it was —

 

so they told me —thefault of the first mate that we did not receive sufficient provisions; the conduct of the doctor towards those sick

 

persons under his charge was characterized by extreme brutality; it was, in fact, a voyage full of the misery of sickness and want, and,

 

at a later period, of danger and death. When I retired to rest on Sunday night, the sea was very rough, the sky clouded and full of

 

tempest; on Monday morning, atthe hour when the cook usuallysummoned the passengers to come and receive their allowance of

 

coffee —that is, between five and sixo'c|ock—the ship struck; Idid not at first know what it was that caused the ship to careen so

 

violently; but some ofthe seamen, actuated by charitable motives, called out from the main hatch, and warned usthat the vessel was

 

ashore, and that we must come on deck if we wished to be saved. At that fearful announcement —scarcely half understood bythe

 

wretched passengers—a few men and women sprangfrom their berths, and rushed upon deck, without waiting to put on any clothes;

 

the next moment I heard the water washing the deck, and experienced a series of violent shocks; from the ship striking the bottom. It

 

was at thistime, as Iafterwards understood, that the houses were washed overboard, and many persons drowned. Atthe first alarm I

 

endeavored to reach mytrunk, which was near the berth Ioccupied, in orderto secure two hundred dollars which I had placed there.  I

 

need offer no excuse for this avarice, as it might be called; it was an instinct of self-possession which dictated the movement,for  I knew

 

that ifsaved by Providence, Iwould be thrown upon a strange land, and that, being without friends, it was necessary Ishould have

 

money for protection.  I succeeded infindingthe purse which contained my only possession, and secured it to my person. Inthe

 

meantime,the  vessel had been beatingfearfully upon the beach, and Iheard loud cries of despair proceedingfrom the deck. Ihurried

 

up the steps, but at the very moment Ihad emerged from the steerage an immense wave burst overthe deck, and carried me with it

 

into the sea. Asl was thus hurried overboard, however, I had presence of mind sufficient to enable me to seize a rope that lay upon

 

the planks near me, and clungtenaciously to it. Asthe waves cast me back towards the ship, a broken sparfloated  near me, I

 

disengaged my right hand from the rope, and clung with my arm around this gift of divine mercy, as I indeed might term it. Thus

 

maintaining my hold upon the rope and the spar, Iwas cast back and forth bythe waves, and it was duringthis terrible episode of my

 

misfortunesthat  my body was bruised by beingthrown violently against the side of the ship. For more than one hour Iwas in this

 

situation, everyone on board of the vessel being too much filled with his own dangerto  notice me; and not the least part of my anguish

 

was itthat while thus numbed with cold and wounded Iwas compelled to listen to the loud, loud cries of terror which burst from the

 

despairing crowd who thronged the riggingof each ofthe masts. It wasthen raining,the wind was high, and the sea running in

 

immense channels. Suddenly the rope by which I had been secured to the ship parted, and Idrifted away, shrieking loudly for

 

assistance. I became almost unconscious; with terror.  Ifelt the huge waves breaking over me, and though from the natural instinct of

 

self-preservation, I clung yet more closelyto the spar, it seemed to me that my hold was gradually relaxing, and I must inevitably perish.

 

How good was Providence to me in the midst of that frightful calamity! The consequence of what seemed to me certain destruction, in

 

reality constituted mysafety, for the tide, being on the flood, carried me to the shore, where Iwas rescued by a generous seaman, at

 

the risk of his own life.

 

And now, while Ireturn due thanks to the Powerthat sustained and preserved me, Imust yet feel deeplythe unfortunate

 

position in which Iam placed. During my struggles for life while inthe water, my clothes were torn to pieces by the action of the waves

 

and chafing with the ship's side; and Iwas, when rescued, totally destitute of garments. Thus, without clothes, money, orfriends to

 

offer assistance, Ifind myself in this strange country—strange as regards both its manners and its language. I have a brother, named

 

Frederick William Haeier, in Wisconsin, but, having lost his letters and address, it will be impossible for me to find him, unless his

 

attention isattracted bythis letterfrom  his unhappy sister."

 

[from the NewYorkHerald of November 16, 1854, pg. 8]

 

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